• Push Button Starting

    From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Sat Mar 9 15:16:58 2013
    *** Answering a msg posted in area MEMORIES (MEMORIES).


    Mark Hofmann wrote to Bob Breed:


    Chrome plated button, maybe 3/8th of an inch in diameter. Mounted
    under the dash, driver side. I think they started that with the
    1940 models, and not sure when they dropped it.

    Inet probably has the story?

    I saw some pictures of the push button start from the late 40s/early
    50s.

    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push button
    starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside down (tumblers up locks).

    I assume they stopped using them for security reasons, but not sure.

    If you note the steering wheel lock mechanism on the right hand side of
    the steering column at the dash, it has a key and an ignition on/off
    switch. The car couldn't be driven when locked, except in a straight line
    or a circle, depending on the wheel position. Most Ford owners disabled
    the lock by unlocking the column and breaking off the key (the lock and
    switch worked independently of each other). Thus, the car could easily be started with a flip of the on/off switch and a push of the starter button. Everybody knew this and still Ford cars were hardly ever stolen. Clyde
    Barrow probably knew this feature and was the reason why he preferred to
    drive Henry's best. This system wasn't in the Model A Fords, but it did
    appear within a year or two after the new Model Bs debuted - c1932.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Sun Mar 10 13:45:19 2013
    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside down (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key start. Seems
    things are going full circle, back to the push button.

    Going between driving the 2012 Charger, 2002 Monte Carlo, and 2001 Durango sometimes throws me for a loop.

    The Charger has the push button start and a shifter that is spring loaded and doesn't really change position. Then the Monte Carlo is key started with a standard shifter. The Durango is key started with the shifter on the steering column.

    Keeps me on my toes.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Mon Mar 11 08:55:02 2013
    Mark Hofmann wrote to Roy Witt:


    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push
    button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked
    like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside down
    (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key
    start. Seems things are going full circle, back to the push button.

    There's a big difference in yesterday's push button start and today's. Everything was mechanical yesterday and now everything is electrical, as
    in solid state RF keys. My last encounter with the solid state keys was
    with a new Dodge van, c2008. Without the key being at least in the
    vacinity of the key hole, the engine wouldn't start. Unlocking a locked
    car is still easy, but there's no way to start it without the key.

    Going between driving the 2012 Charger, 2002 Monte Carlo, and 2001
    Durango sometimes throws me for a loop.

    The Charger has the push button start and a shifter that is spring
    loaded and doesn't really change position. Then the Monte Carlo is
    key started with a standard shifter. The Durango is key started with
    the shifter on the steering column.

    Keeps me on my toes.

    Try driving a manual transmission and an automatic. My Z28 has key start
    on the column and a 6spd manual trans, while the Silverado has key start
    on the column and shifter on the column. In the Silverado you can see
    traffic ahead for 1/2 a mile, minimum, while in the Z28, all you can see
    is the rear bumper of trucks like my Silverado.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From mark lewis@1:3634/12.42 to Mark Hofmann on Mon Mar 11 16:43:27 2013
    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push
    button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked
    like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside
    down (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key
    start. Seems things are going full circle, back to the push
    button.

    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old high beam headlight switches... the old truck we used on my g-father's farm had its starter switch on the floor... with the clutch, brake, gas and highbeams...

    )\/(ark

    ---
    * Origin: (1:3634/12.42)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to MARK LEWIS on Tue Mar 12 07:55:00 2013
    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push
    button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked ML>RW> like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside
    down (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key start. Seems things are going full circle, back to the push
    button.

    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old high beam ML>headlight switches... the old truck we used on my g-father's farm had its ML>starter switch on the floor... with the clutch, brake, gas and highbeams...

    That as a GM Feature back in the 40's, Maybe even before.
    The Starter was acticated by pressing a pedal located under the
    dashboard just above the gas pedal
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ 0
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Bill Burton@1:2215/15 to TOM WALKER on Tue Mar 12 11:39:04 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote in a message to MARK LEWIS:

    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push
    button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked ML>RW> like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside
    down (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key start. Seems things are going full circle, back to the push
    button.

    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old
    high beam
    headlight switches... the old truck we used on my g-father's farm had its ML>starter switch on the floor... with the clutch, brake, gas and ML>highbeams...

    That as a GM Feature back in the 40's, Maybe even before.
    The Starter was acticated by pressing a pedal located under the
    dashboard just above the gas pedal

    The Ford Model T had the starter switch on the floorboard in the late 1920's.

    Later,
    Bill

    Internet: wabusa.com Telnet: bbs.wabusa.com Fidonet POTS: 330-548-2566
    ---
    * Origin: INA:fidonet.wabusa.com, IBN (1:2215/15)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Tue Mar 12 12:29:23 2013
    There's a big difference in yesterday's push button start and today's. Everything was mechanical yesterday and now everything is electrical, as
    in solid state RF keys. My last encounter with the solid state keys was with a new Dodge van, c2008. Without the key being at least in the
    vacinity of the key hole, the engine wouldn't start. Unlocking a locked
    car is still easy, but there's no way to start it without the key.

    Have not run into this yet, but what happens when the battery in the key fob goes dead? Is there another way to start the car?

    I know there is a key that I can use for the door, but not aware of another way
    to active the push button start.

    Try driving a manual transmission and an automatic. My Z28 has key start
    on the column and a 6spd manual trans, while the Silverado has key start
    on the column and shifter on the column. In the Silverado you can see traffic ahead for 1/2 a mile, minimum, while in the Z28, all you can see
    is the rear bumper of trucks like my Silverado.

    Forgot to add, the Charger is an 8-speed automatic vs. the more common 4-speed.

    There is a big difference going between driving a 4x4 truck and either of my cars. Then hop on the Harley Davidson's 5-speed manual transmission.

    I have never driven a manual transmission car. I learned manual transmission with the HD, which is still much different than a car. When I think clutch, I think left hand.

    A friend of mine has an old-school HD with the "stick shifter" and the clutch is on the right side. Totally the opposite of how the modern bikes are made. It was made in the 40s or 50s. He has several retro-HDs along with one from the past decade. One of them is a 1953 Panhead.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Mark Lewis on Tue Mar 12 12:38:50 2013
    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old high beam
    headlight switches... the old truck we used on my g-father's farm had its starter switch on the floor... with the clutch, brake, gas and
    highbeams...

    I remember the highbeam button on the floor.

    My mom had the same car for most of my childhood. A 1969 Dodge Coronet. It was a lime green.. Loved that car - especially when the exhaust rusted out and was loud. :) Would love to have that car today.

    It had no A/C, no seatbelts, and an AM only radio.

    The good old days!

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Mark Hofmann on Tue Mar 12 13:14:32 2013
    My mom had the same car for most of my childhood. A 1969 Dodge Coronet.
    It was a lime green.. Loved that car - especially when the exhaust

    Correction..

    It was a 1968 Dodge Coronet. Just checked the pictures and could tell based on
    the tail light differences.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Tue Mar 12 16:31:58 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to MARK LEWIS:

    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old
    high beam headlight switches... the old truck we used on my
    g-father's farm had its starter switch on the floor... with the
    clutch, brake, gas and highbeams...

    That as a GM Feature back in the 40's, Maybe even before. The Starter
    was acticated by pressing a pedal located under the dashboard just
    above the gas pedal

    That was a cost accounting way of saving money. They avoided the starter solenoid (Cad, LaSalle, Buick and Olds had them) by incorporating a
    manually operated foot switch attached directly to the starter. You can
    still buy a replacement for about $20 and it will fit 1929 - 1937 and
    later Chevy's that didn't have a solenoid operated starter. My dad's 46
    Chevy had the switch and I remember some 1950s pickups that still used
    that switch.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Tue Mar 12 16:15:32 2013
    Mark Hofmann wrote to Roy Witt:


    There's a big difference in yesterday's push button start and
    today's. Everything was mechanical yesterday and now everything is
    electrical, as in solid state RF keys. My last encounter with the
    solid state keys was with a new Dodge van, c2008. Without the key
    being at least in the vacinity of the key hole, the engine wouldn't
    start. Unlocking a locked car is still easy, but there's no way to
    start it without the key.

    Have not run into this yet, but what happens when the battery in the
    key fob goes dead? Is there another way to start the car?

    Dunno. The alarm system on my older Z28 had a key fob like that and when
    the battery went dead, all you had to do was put up with the alarm going
    off until you could turn the ignition key and flip the hidden switch to
    turn off the alarm. Reas the owner's manual and let us know how to get
    around it.

    I know there is a key that I can use for the door, but not aware of another way to active the push button start.

    Hopefully you have stored a spare battery in the car as a backup.
    Otherwise, you'll have to walk to a store to buy another and have them
    replace the dead battery.

    Try driving a manual transmission and an automatic. My Z28 has key
    start on the column and a 6spd manual trans, while the Silverado has
    key start on the column and shifter on the column. In the Silverado
    you can see traffic ahead for 1/2 a mile, minimum, while in the Z28,
    all you can see is the rear bumper of trucks like my Silverado.

    Forgot to add, the Charger is an 8-speed automatic vs. the more
    common 4-speed.

    What I'm wondering about that 8 spd is how does an underpowered engine
    pull the load when it is in 8th gear?

    There is a big difference going between driving a 4x4 truck and
    either of my cars. Then hop on the Harley Davidson's 5-speed manual transmission.

    Mine has that too. Before the HD, I had a Honda 400/4 with a 6spd.

    I have never driven a manual transmission car. I learned manual transmission with the HD, which is still much different than a car.
    When I think clutch, I think left hand.

    vs left foot...been there.

    A friend of mine has an old-school HD with the "stick shifter" and
    the clutch is on the right side.

    A high school friend of mine had a RH tank-shifter, can't remember
    whether is was right or left foot clutch HD...It was that foot clutch
    linkage that was his demise, as he was adjusting it while driving along
    and running out of road. He ended up a paraplegic and never rode again.

    Totally the opposite of how the modern bikes are made. It was made
    in the 40s or 50s. He has several retro-HDs along with one from the
    past decade. One of them is a 1953 Panhead.

    When I was in HS, I owned a 1952 Triumph that had a left handed clutch
    with a right foot shifter. When I took my Texas MC 'refresher' course,
    they had me on a late model (theirs) Honda with everything backwards from
    my 2 1952 Triumphs and 1963 and 1976 Hondas...

    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to BILL BURTON on Wed Mar 13 07:43:00 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote in a message to MARK LEWIS:

    Last early 50s Ford I had was a 51 and it no longer had the push BB>ML>RW> button starter switch. The ignition switch was keyed and it worked BB>ML>RW> like GM cars, except that the Ford keys were inserted upside BB>ML>RW> down (tumblers up locks).

    I never realized that push button start was around before the key BB>ML> MH> start. Seems things are going full circle, back to the push
    button.

    i seem to recall they used to be buttons on the floor like the old BB>ML>high beam
    headlight switches... the old truck we used on my g-father's farm had its BB>ML>starter switch on the floor... with the clutch, brake, gas and BB>ML>highbeams...

    That as a GM Feature back in the 40's, Maybe even before.
    The Starter was acticated by pressing a pedal located under the dashboard just above the gas pedal

    The Ford Model T had the starter switch on the floorboard in the late 1920's

    Frogot about those Fords. In summer of 1947 My father decided working on
    a Wheat Farm up in Montana would expand my Horzions so he leant me to
    n old couple with a smal place. I got to drive a Model "A" Truck to haul
    the grain form the combine to his wheat silo and and also drive several
    truck loads to the Grain Elevator in town. IT had that type of starter
    pedal.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Wed Mar 13 12:51:38 2013
    Have not run into this yet, but what happens when the battery in the key fob goes dead? Is there another way to start the car?

    Dunno. The alarm system on my older Z28 had a key fob like that and when the battery went dead, all you had to do was put up with the alarm going off until you could turn the ignition key and flip the hidden switch to turn off the alarm. Reas the owner's manual and let us know how to get around it.

    Will have to check this out when I got to my car, but found the solution.

    My Charger keyfob has regular key inside of it (once you access the opening and
    take it out). They call it a "Valet Parking key", so you don't have to give your keyfob to anyone. That will allow you to open the driver's side door. Once inside the car, you can start it by taking the key and inserting it in an access panel behind the glovebox.

    Will have to check that out later.

    What I'm wondering about that 8 spd is how does an underpowered engine
    pull the load when it is in 8th gear?

    If you floor it in 8th gear, it will just downshift. Even the 3.6L V6 is very fast and responsive in the Charger. It is rated around 300HP. I am still very
    suprised how fast that car is compared to my Monte Carlo, which is a 3.4L V6 and around 180HP.

    A high school friend of mine had a RH tank-shifter, can't remember
    whether is was right or left foot clutch HD...It was that foot clutch linkage that was his demise, as he was adjusting it while driving along
    and running out of road. He ended up a paraplegic and never rode again.

    I have watched my friend shift that old Panhead and it looks very awkward. I can see how someone could have issues with that.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Thu Mar 14 15:43:10 2013
    Mark Hofmann wrote to Roy Witt:


    Have not run into this yet, but what happens when the battery
    in the key fob goes dead? Is there another way to start the
    car?

    Dunno. The alarm system on my older Z28 had a key fob like that and
    when the battery went dead, all you had to do was put up with the
    alarm going off until you could turn the ignition key and flip the
    hidden switch to turn off the alarm. Reas the owner's manual and let
    us know how to get around it.

    Will have to check this out when I got to my car, but found the
    solution.

    My Charger keyfob has regular key inside of it (once you access the opening and take it out). They call it a "Valet Parking key", so you don't have to give your keyfob to anyone. That will allow you to
    open the driver's side door. Once inside the car, you can start it by taking the key and inserting it in an access panel behind the
    glovebox.

    Hmmmm. Behind the glove box. Do you have to remove the box before
    accessing that panel?

    Will have to check that out later.

    What I'm wondering about that 8 spd is how does an underpowered
    engine pull the load when it is in 8th gear?

    If you floor it in 8th gear, it will just downshift.

    I'm thinking of my friend, Fred. He has a 2007 Tahoe, that downshifts out
    of 4th (OD) when climbing a small grade. Especially when he's towing his
    boat. That motor is the same as my pickup, which has no downshifting
    problem like his; a 4.8L V8 with about 300hp and the same torque values.
    Both vehicles have the same trans, same rear end gear ratio, but the Tahoe weighs slightly more than my short bed pickup. Another differnce is that
    I've re-programmed the trans to use more hydraulic pressure when shifting.
    99% vs 90%

    Even the 3.6L V6 is very fast and responsive in the Charger.

    Yeah, but what is the torque spec on that 6 banger and at what RPM does
    it peak?

    It is rated around 300HP. I am still very suprised how fast that
    car is compared to my Monte Carlo, which is a 3.4L V6 and around
    180HP.

    Computers do wonders for old technology. That 3.6L wouldn't perform as
    well as it does without it. GM's 4.3L V6 was vastly improved once they put
    a computer in the car to manage fuel, etc.. Then they deleted that option
    (in pickups) in favor of a small V8.

    A high school friend of mine had a RH tank-shifter, can't remember
    whether is was right or left foot clutch HD...It was that foot
    clutch linkage that was his demise, as he was adjusting it while
    driving along and running out of road. He ended up a paraplegic and
    never rode again.

    I have watched my friend shift that old Panhead and it looks very
    awkward. I can see how someone could have issues with that.

    Jim was more mechanically inclined when we were in high school than I was.
    He had taken that HD engine apart, bored it to use flathead ford pistons
    and up the HP quite a bit. It nearly drove out from under me, as I sat on
    the back of it. If I wasn't hanging on, I probably would have ended up on
    my butt in the street. He also stripped the bike to have a smaller tank,
    bobbed fenders and not much else. Still, it wasn't speed that got him,
    but the need to adjust the clutch linkage, which he had done several times
    on the fly, even though it was easier to do while the bike was parked...

    The kid that got my Honda 4 was adjusting carbs on the fly when he ran
    into the back of a parked car. Lucky kid who flew over the top of the car,
    but broke his collar bone when he landed.

    Worst case I ever got was running into a 59 Cadillac sitting in an
    intersection pointed left, but with the right turn signal flashing. I went
    to the left and he began to move left. I swerved right but he stopped and
    I hit his rear tail light with my knee. Damn glad I didn't hit that tail
    fin or I would've been punctured through the middle. Got a new trans and
    front end on my Triumph bike because the driver was drunk driving.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Fri Mar 15 17:38:47 2013
    Hmmmm. Behind the glove box. Do you have to remove the box before
    accessing that panel?

    Correction. That information was for another type of car.

    For the Dodge Charger, it is the complete opposite of what I had said. You give the KEYFOB to the valet parking and keep the key that comes out of the keyfob.

    The key will let you in the driver's side door and in the glovebox (which locks).

    If the battery is dead or near dead, you are supposed to hold the keyfob directly up to the push button start. Not sure how this works if the battery is totally dead, but hope I don't have to find out.

    Typically, you will notice a bad battery in a keyfob in advance - since the distance you can use it will decline.

    I'm thinking of my friend, Fred. He has a 2007 Tahoe, that downshifts out of 4th (OD) when climbing a small grade. Especially when he's towing his boat. That motor is the same as my pickup, which has no downshifting problem like his; a 4.8L V8 with about 300hp and the same torque values. Both vehicles have the same trans, same rear end gear ratio, but the
    Tahoe
    weighs slightly more than my short bed pickup. Another differnce is that I've re-programmed the trans to use more hydraulic pressure when
    shifting.
    99% vs 90%

    You have one of those fancy programmers?

    Yeah, but what is the torque spec on that 6 banger and at what RPM does
    it peak?

    I have seen it go over 6000rpm. Red line is in the 7500 neighborhood and goes to 8000. I can floor it at 80mph and still get a kick back in my seat. :)

    Computers do wonders for old technology. That 3.6L wouldn't perform as
    well as it does without it. GM's 4.3L V6 was vastly improved once they
    put
    a computer in the car to manage fuel, etc.. Then they deleted that option (in pickups) in favor of a small V8.

    Yes, the PCM and TCM. Both engine and transmission are computer controlled.

    Worst case I ever got was running into a 59 Cadillac sitting in an intersection pointed left, but with the right turn signal flashing. I
    went
    to the left and he began to move left. I swerved right but he stopped and
    I hit his rear tail light with my knee. Damn glad I didn't hit that tail fin or I would've been punctured through the middle. Got a new trans and front end on my Triumph bike because the driver was drunk driving.

    I didn't tell many people (so not to scare family members), but I was rear-ended on an interstate going home from work on my Harley a few years ago. There was traffic backed up and things slowed to a crawl. A young girl wearing
    flip flops didn't stop in time and hit me going around 10mph or so (as I was stopped).

    The back tire acted as a soft bumper and just pushed me forward about 15 feet or so while the tire skid. I kept the bike up the entire time. No damage was done other than the tire and bent license plate.

    Her car had more damage than my bike.. I felt that an angel was looking over me that day..

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Sun May 5 14:57:47 2013
    Mark Hofmann wrote to Roy Witt:


    Hmmmm. Behind the glove box. Do you have to remove the box before
    accessing that panel?

    Correction. That information was for another type of car.

    For the Dodge Charger, it is the complete opposite of what I had
    said. You give the KEYFOB to the valet parking and keep the key that comes out of the keyfob.

    That's normal in GM cars, give the igniton key to valet parking and keep
    the trunk and glove box key in your pocket.

    The key will let you in the driver's side door and in the glovebox
    (which locks).

    If the battery is dead or near dead, you are supposed to hold the
    keyfob directly up to the push button start. Not sure how this works
    if the battery is totally dead, but hope I don't have to find out.

    RFID; the FOB is powered by the vehicles RF energy to read the VIN code
    imbeded in the FOB's memory...

    Typically, you will notice a bad battery in a keyfob in advance -
    since the distance you can use it will decline.

    That's true. The remote entry FOB for my Camaro is getting pretty weak, as
    it won't unlock the doors or hatch until I'm next to the car and pointing
    the remote in the window. I used to be able to find my car from a long
    distance in a parking lot with that remote.

    I'm thinking of my friend, Fred. He has a 2007 Tahoe, that
    downshifts out of 4th (OD) when climbing a small grade. Especially
    when he's towing his boat. That motor is the same as my pickup,
    which has no downshifting problem like his; a 4.8L V8 with about
    300hp and the same torque values. Both vehicles have the same trans,
    same rear end gear ratio, but the Tahoe weighs slightly more than my
    short bed pickup. Another differnce is that I've re-programmed the
    trans to use more hydraulic pressure when shifting. 99% vs 90%

    You have one of those fancy programmers?

    HD Tuner...I just got a software update for it yesterday too.

    Yeah, but what is the torque spec on that 6 banger and at what RPM
    does it peak?

    I have seen it go over 6000rpm. Red line is in the 7500 neighborhood
    and goes to 8000. I can floor it at 80mph and still get a kick back
    in my seat. :)

    Ahhhh. That tells me that it doesn't make much torque. A 300HP V8 will
    make gobs of torque down low and these days, only rev to 5800 RPM, 6000
    max...

    Computers do wonders for old technology. That 3.6L wouldn't perform
    as well as it does without it. GM's 4.3L V6 was vastly improved once
    they put a computer in the car to manage fuel, etc.. Then they
    deleted that option (in pickups) in favor of a small V8.

    Yes, the PCM and TCM. Both engine and transmission are computer controlled.

    Yeah, Mopars have two CPUs onboard...GM only uses one PCM to control
    engine, trans and braking...

    Worst case I ever got was running into a 59 Cadillac sitting in an
    intersection pointed left, but with the right turn signal flashing.
    I went to the left and he began to move left. I swerved right but he
    stopped and I hit his rear tail light with my knee. Damn glad I
    didn't hit that tail fin or I would've been punctured through the
    middle. Got a new trans and front end on my Triumph bike because the
    driver was drunk driving.

    I didn't tell many people (so not to scare family members), but I was rear-ended on an interstate going home from work on my Harley a few
    years ago. There was traffic backed up and things slowed to a crawl.
    A young girl wearing flip flops didn't stop in time and hit me going around 10mph or so (as I was stopped).

    Something similar happened in the lane next to me on I-15. Only it was the opposite; biker hit the car next to me and he got sandwiched by the car
    behind him. Last I looked, he wasn't doing very well.

    The back tire acted as a soft bumper and just pushed me forward about
    15 feet or so while the tire skid. I kept the bike up the entire
    time. No damage was done other than the tire and bent license plate.

    Lucky you...that's a close one.

    Her car had more damage than my bike.. I felt that an angel was
    looking over me that day..

    That's a good posibility...


    R\%/itt


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  • From Jim Haight@1:322/757 to Mark Hofmann on Wed May 29 18:02:56 2013
    Re: Re: Push Button Starting

    There was traffic backed up and things slowed to a crawl. A young girl weari flip flops didn't stop in time and hit me going around 10mph or so (as I was stopped).
    The back tire acted as a soft bumper and just pushed me forward about 15 feet so while the tire skid. I kept the bike up the entire time. No damage was d other than the tire and bent license plate.
    Her car had more damage than my bike.. I felt that an angel was looking over that day..
    - Mark

    You are lucky! Just think if she was barefoot like most Harford Co. girls :)

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