• Ow!

    From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Mon Mar 11 12:16:18 2013
    Hello Roy!

    I just missed getting a 1996 Mercedes the same color as mine. My SIL (bless him!) told me a week ago he saw a for sale sign on it, but what he forgot to mention was how long ago he saw it. It's near where I used to live, so it wasn't out of the way for me to go check it out. When I got there, the Mercedes was gone and I could still see the imprints on the ground where the car's tires had been sitting. I started to knock on the door to inquire what they sold it for, but I was already disappointed and didn't want to add to that.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Tue Mar 12 10:03:02 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I just missed getting a 1996 Mercedes the same color as mine.

    You got lucky.

    My SIL (bless him!) told me a week ago he saw a for sale sign on it,
    but what he forgot to mention was how long ago he saw it. It's near
    where I used to live, so it wasn't out of the way for me to go check
    it out. When I got there, the Mercedes was gone and I could still
    see the imprints on the ground where the car's tires had been
    sitting.

    Any sign of a tow truck around there? Dually tracks?

    I started to knock on the door to inquire what they sold it
    for, but I was already disappointed and didn't want to add to that.

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Tue Mar 12 13:04:03 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I just missed getting a 1996 Mercedes the same color as mine.

    You got lucky.

    (-:

    Any sign of a tow truck around there? Dually tracks?

    Nada.

    I started to knock on the door to inquire what they sold it
    for, but I was already disappointed and didn't want to add to that.

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just produced, but I'm a
    little short of cash right now. (-:[


    Regards,

    Roger

    --- D'Bridge 3.9
    * Origin: NCS BBS (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Tue Mar 12 16:11:51 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just produced,
    but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change right
    now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next week if he was
    feeling real stingy.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Tue Mar 12 22:02:58 2013
    On Tue Mar-12-2013 16:11, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just produced,
    but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change
    right now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next week
    if he was feeling real stingy.

    Did you see that car? It's amazing.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Wed Mar 13 07:48:00 2013
    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.


    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom Strkes Again
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to TOM WALKER on Wed Mar 13 12:00:41 2013
    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)

    I don't, but that's why I keep looking around for one for sale that I can use for parts.


    Regards,

    Roger

    --- D'Bridge 3.91
    * Origin: NCS BBS (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Wed Mar 13 11:10:44 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)

    If you have enough money, a new one would be better.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Wed Mar 13 11:11:24 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just
    produced, but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change
    right now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next week
    if he was feeling real stingy.

    Did you see that car?

    Which car?


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Wed Mar 13 22:11:50 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just
    produced, but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change RW>RW>> right now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next week RW>RW>> if he was feeling real stingy.

    Did you see that car?

    Which car?

    The new Mercedes SLS electric. I'll send the link.


    Regards,

    Roger

    --- D'Bridge 3.91
    * Origin: NCS BBS (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Thu Mar 14 07:27:00 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)

    If you have enough money, a new one would be better.

    While Riogers reson is different som just fal in love with aparticualr
    mordel of car and that is al they want. NEW is NOT Always Better in
    the mind of some, ME Included.
    IF I was younger I would locate and buy a 1963 Pontiac Tempest
    Convertable with the 326 V-8
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ 0
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 14 11:01:12 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to TOM WALKER:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)

    I don't, but that's why I keep looking around for one for sale that I
    can use for parts.

    Ahhhh. One can never have enough parts cars in the yard.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 14 11:04:04 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just
    produced, but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change
    right now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next
    week if he was feeling real stingy.

    Did you see that car?

    Which car?

    The new Mercedes SLS electric. I'll send the link.

    I think I'd rather have one of those 2 seater electrics with the
    performance of a Corvette, made in California. Cost is about the same...

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and hits the
    road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars already on the
    road.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Thu Mar 14 11:19:48 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to TOM WALKER:

    I think a 96 is a bit too old for a MB.

    Not if you have enough Money!! :-) :-)

    I don't, but that's why I keep looking around for one for sale that
    I
    can use for parts.

    Ahhhh. One can never have enough parts cars in the yard.

    Space is limited by the humongous oak trees in the yard. And no, I'm not cutting them down.


    Regards,

    Roger

    --- D'Bridge 3.91
    * Origin: NCS BBS (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Thu Mar 14 11:08:50 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    If you have enough money, a new one would be better.

    While Riogers reson is different som just fal in love with
    aparticualr mordel of car and that is al they want.

    Until they get it, then they usually realize what a big mistake they made.

    NEW is NOT Always Better in the mind of some, ME Included.

    8^) My last new car was a 1968 Camaro RS/SS 396...

    IF I was younger I would locate and buy a 1963 Pontiac Tempest
    Convertable with the 326 V-8

    I had two of those in the coupe model...It was a good car, but the problem
    I saw was the flexible drive shaft cable. Not to mention you would have to
    have a couple of 'parts cars' to at least keep the transaxle alive. I also
    had a 61 Buick Special, which had an automatic trans that was exclusive to
    that model, Buick, Olds and Pontiac...I finally went back to the more
    reliable cars, Chevys...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 14 15:39:25 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I don't, but that's why I keep looking around for one for sale
    that I can use for parts.

    Ahhhh. One can never have enough parts cars in the yard.

    Space is limited by the humongous oak trees in the yard. And no, I'm
    not cutting them down.

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in the barn or a garage, out of the weather.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Thu Mar 14 21:08:49 2013
    On Thu Mar-14-2013 11:04, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    Yeah, well I'd like to have the $500,000 electric they just
    produced, but I'm a little short of cash right now. (-:[

    Like my dad used to say; I don't have that much in pocket change
    right now. Can it wait until I hit the bank, tomorrow? Or next
    week if he was feeling real stingy.

    Did you see that car?

    Which car?

    The new Mercedes SLS electric. I'll send the link.

    I think I'd rather have one of those 2 seater electrics with the performance of a Corvette, made in California. Cost is about the
    same...

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and
    hits the road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars already on the road.

    The Tesla? They're $100,000+.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Fri Mar 15 09:14:00 2013
    The new Mercedes SLS electric. I'll send the link.

    I think I'd rather have one of those 2 seater electrics with the RW>performance of a Corvette, made in California. Cost is about the same...

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and hits the RW>road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars already on the RW>road.

    YEP but the Brain Dead Tree Huggers cannot see that. They just blindly
    push Electric Cars.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ 0
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Fri Mar 15 09:19:00 2013
    Space is limited by the humongous oak trees in the yard. And no, I'm not cutting them down.

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade tree RW>mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in the barn or a RW>garage, out of the weather.

    Adn a grove of Large trees is a natural Air Conditioner.
    Ever wonder why al of those Large Plasntation Houses in the South were
    covered by Large Trees?
    I know when I used to drive out to Campo in the Summer across Buckman
    Springs road as you went thropugh spots where the road was totally
    lined with Large trees there was a noticable temperature drop as one
    drove through.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Fri Mar 15 11:22:08 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think I'd rather have one of those 2 seater electrics with the
    performance of a Corvette, made in California. Cost is about the
    same...

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and
    hits the road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars
    already on the road.

    The Tesla? They're $100,000+.

    American made...keep the wealth in the USA, I always say...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Fri Mar 15 12:17:04 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    The new Mercedes SLS electric. I'll send the link.

    I think I'd rather have one of those 2 seater electrics with the
    performance of a Corvette, made in California. Cost is about the
    same...

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and hits
    the road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars
    already on the road.

    YEP but the Brain Dead Tree Huggers cannot see that. They just
    blindly push Electric Cars.

    California tree huggers. Most of us out here have a bit more sense than to listen to their kind.

    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Fri Mar 15 12:18:31 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    Space is limited by the humongous oak trees in the yard. And
    no, I'm not cutting them down.

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in the
    barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    Adn a grove of Large trees is a natural Air Conditioner.
    Ever wonder why al of those Large Plasntation Houses in the South
    were covered by Large Trees?

    No, I know how they can drop the temps cooler than the surrounding area. I
    used to hunt Dove and Quail in the desert. That is, until I found a place
    near Warner Springs that had a grove of trees, spring water and it was
    posted, no hunting. I asked and received permission from the owner on my
    first hunt there. 8^) (He and I were huddled under the same tree)

    I know when I used to drive out to Campo in the Summer across Buckman Springs road as you went thropugh spots where the road was totally
    lined with Large trees there was a noticable temperature drop as one
    drove through.

    Living in south Texas, you get to appreciate trees a lot more than
    anywhere else I've lived. Living next to an ocean, you don't notice the
    temps so much because of the onshore airflow. Living in Texas, there is no onshore flow unless it comes from the SE, then it is humid air. When the
    temps get into the high 90s around here, the shade of a tree is very much appreciated...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Fri Mar 15 11:57:03 2013
    On Thu Mar-14-2013 15:39, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I don't, but that's why I keep looking around for one for sale
    that I can use for parts.

    Ahhhh. One can never have enough parts cars in the yard.

    Space is limited by the humongous oak trees in the yard. And no, I'm
    not cutting them down.

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in
    the barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    It looks as though I'm going to have to research two things on the M-B. 1) how
    to change the spark plugs and 2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for a long time, but something always gets in the way of that.
    I've changed the spark plugs on the Lincoln, so the M-B should be easier (if my knees hold up).


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Sat Mar 16 10:40:29 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in
    the barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    It looks as though I'm going to have to research two things on the
    M-B. 1) how to change the spark plugs and

    Shouldn't be too much of a chore.

    2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for a
    long time, but something always gets in the way of that.

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging system. There
    are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is the low pressure side
    and the other one is the high pressure side of the system. The re-charger
    has the proper sized port connector, so you can't mess with the wrong one
    (high pressure). The recharger comes with procedure instructions, so you should be successful the first time.

    I've changed the spark plugs on the Lincoln, so the M-B should be
    easier (if my knees hold up).

    My high school buddy who became a paraplegic from a motorcycle accident
    had leg braces that allowed him to lean against the car and work on the
    engine. He also had a service station, pumped gas and serviced his and his customer's cars. Of course he was in his late teens, early 20s and that
    made it easier for him. Old guys like us have to slow down and do things a little differently, but we can still get the job done. I find that getting
    up and down when working under the car is a bit of a chore these
    days...even more than it was 7-8 years ago when I wasn't feeling my age as
    much as I do today.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sat Mar 16 12:01:14 2013
    On Sat Mar-16-2013 10:40, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in
    the barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    It looks as though I'm going to have to research two things on the
    M-B. 1) how to change the spark plugs and

    Shouldn't be too much of a chore.

    It looks different than the Lincoln.

    2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for a
    long time, but something always gets in the way of that.

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging
    system. There are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is
    the low pressure side and the other one is the high pressure side
    of the system. The re-charger has the proper sized port connector,
    so you can't mess with the wrong one (high pressure). The
    recharger comes with procedure instructions, so you should be
    successful the first time.

    Seems simple enough.

    I've changed the spark plugs on the Lincoln, so the M-B should be
    easier (if my knees hold up).

    My high school buddy who became a paraplegic from a motorcycle
    accident had leg braces that allowed him to lean against the car
    and work on the engine. He also had a service station, pumped gas
    and serviced his and his customer's cars. Of course he was in his
    late teens, early 20s and that made it easier for him. Old guys
    like us have to slow down and do things a little differently, but
    we can still get the job done. I find that getting up and down when working under the car is a bit of a chore these days...even more
    than it was 7-8 years ago when I wasn't feeling my age as much as I
    do today.

    Isn't THAT the truth! (-:


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Sun Mar 17 07:34:00 2013
    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and hits RW>> the road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered cars
    already on the road.

    YEP but the Brain Dead Tree Huggers cannot see that. They just
    blindly push Electric Cars.

    California tree huggers. Most of us out here have a bit more sense than to RW>listen to their kind.

    While we may have a large nunber they infest the rest of the country
    also. THEY were behing the Blocking of the Pipeline form Canada so they
    could some of their Excess to the US, They are also figthing to block
    the drilling for the oil under the Dakotas.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom Strkes Again
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Sun Mar 17 07:58:00 2013
    2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for a long time, but something always gets in the way of that.

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging system. There RW>are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is the low pressure side RW>and the other one is the high pressure side of the system. The re-charger RW>has the proper sized port connector, so you can't mess with the wrong one RW>(high pressure). The recharger comes with procedure instructions, so you RW>should be successful the first time.

    One has to pay careful attention to the instructions as it is very easy
    to Overcharge the system. And it causes problems, some of which can
    damage the compressor.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Sat Mar 16 16:24:58 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in
    the barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    It looks as though I'm going to have to research two things on the
    M-B. 1) how to change the spark plugs and

    Shouldn't be too much of a chore.

    It looks different than the Lincoln.

    One is inline, the other is a V...

    2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for
    a long time, but something always gets in the way of that.

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging
    system. There are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is
    the low pressure side and the other one is the high pressure side
    of the system. The re-charger has the proper sized port connector,
    so you can't mess with the wrong one (high pressure). The
    recharger comes with procedure instructions, so you should be
    successful the first time.

    Seems simple enough.

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find your
    freon leak...

    I've changed the spark plugs on the Lincoln, so the M-B should be
    easier (if my knees hold up).

    My high school buddy who became a paraplegic from a motorcycle
    accident had leg braces that allowed him to lean against the car
    and work on the engine. He also had a service station, pumped gas
    and serviced his and his customer's cars. Of course he was in his
    late teens, early 20s and that made it easier for him. Old guys
    like us have to slow down and do things a little differently, but
    we can still get the job done. I find that getting up and down when
    working under the car is a bit of a chore these days...even more
    than it was 7-8 years ago when I wasn't feeling my age as much as I
    do today.

    Isn't THAT the truth! (-:

    If I don't stay active on a daily basis, an old hip injury from karate'
    class when I was 35, gives me joint pain ... that got to be so bad that I couldn't get comfortable, no matter what I tried. Heat pads helped, but I couldn't get into a waterbed with that. I finally began taking about Glucosamine Chondroitin on a daily basis. Today I can finally get some
    sleep without the pain getting to me.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Sun Mar 17 10:49:19 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    BTW, by the time that electric gets done being manufactured and RW>>> hits the road, it has polluted as much as ten gasoline powered
    cars already on the road.

    YEP but the Brain Dead Tree Huggers cannot see that. They just
    blindly push Electric Cars.

    California tree huggers. Most of us out here have a bit more sense
    than to listen to their kind.

    While we may have a large nunber they infest the rest of the country
    also. THEY were behing the Blocking of the Pipeline form Canada so
    they could some of their Excess to the US, They are also figthing to
    block the drilling for the oil under the Dakotas.

    Are you sure those aren't Californians acting up in other states?


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Sun Mar 17 10:50:29 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging system.
    There are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is the low
    pressure side and the other one is the high pressure side of the
    system. The re-charger has the proper sized port connector, so you
    can't mess with the wrong one (high pressure). The recharger comes
    with procedure instructions, so you should be successful the first
    time.

    One has to pay careful attention to the instructions as it is very
    easy to Overcharge the system. And it causes problems, some of which
    can damage the compressor.

    If you have a gauge on the recharger, knowing how many psi your system is supposed to have in it, then you're pretty safe. i.e. the gauge on mine
    goes from 0 to over 200 psi, with the 0-45lbs range painted green, 45-65
    psi range painted in yellow and the rest of the gauge, 65-210 psi painted
    red. Of course, anything in the green is safe, yellow is asking for
    trouble and red is dangerous to man and vehicle.

    PS - never buy a recharger that doesn't have a gauge...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Wed Mar 20 05:16:23 2013
    On Sat Mar-16-2013 16:24, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I wouldn't cut them down either. Large trees are why we have shade
    tree mechanics. Remove the shade trees and you'd have to work in
    the barn or a garage, out of the weather.

    It looks as though I'm going to have to research two things on the
    M-B. 1) how to change the spark plugs and

    Shouldn't be too much of a chore.

    It looks different than the Lincoln.

    One is inline, the other is a V...

    Not what I meant. Accessing the spark plugs is what I was referring to.

    2) how to charge the A/C. I've wanted to learn to do the latter for
    a long time, but something always gets in the way of that.

    That's easy these days. Buy a can of freon and a re-charging
    system. There are only two ports in the AC system. One of them is
    the low pressure side and the other one is the high pressure side
    of the system. The re-charger has the proper sized port connector,
    so you can't mess with the wrong one (high pressure). The
    recharger comes with procedure instructions, so you should be
    successful the first time.

    Seems simple enough.

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red Angel in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    I've changed the spark plugs on the Lincoln, so the M-B should be
    easier (if my knees hold up).

    My high school buddy who became a paraplegic from a motorcycle
    accident had leg braces that allowed him to lean against the car
    and work on the engine. He also had a service station, pumped gas
    and serviced his and his customer's cars. Of course he was in his
    late teens, early 20s and that made it easier for him. Old guys
    like us have to slow down and do things a little differently, but
    we can still get the job done. I find that getting up and down when
    working under the car is a bit of a chore these days...even more
    than it was 7-8 years ago when I wasn't feeling my age as much as I
    do today.

    Isn't THAT the truth! (-:

    If I don't stay active on a daily basis, an old hip injury from
    karate' class when I was 35, gives me joint pain ... that got to be
    so bad that I couldn't get comfortable, no matter what I tried.
    Heat pads helped, but I couldn't get into a waterbed with that. I
    finally began taking about Glucosamine Chondroitin on a daily
    basis. Today I can finally get some sleep without the pain getting
    to me.

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I had in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it more and more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Wed Mar 20 12:43:42 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    It looks different than the Lincoln.

    One is inline, the other is a V...

    Not what I meant. Accessing the spark plugs is what I was referring
    to.

    Shouldn't be too hard to do...

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red Angel
    in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor is
    locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch at all.
    This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the engine runs
    hotter and that also affects emissions...

    If I don't stay active on a daily basis, an old hip injury from
    karate' class when I was 35, gives me joint pain ... that got to be
    so bad that I couldn't get comfortable, no matter what I tried.
    Heat pads helped, but I couldn't get into a waterbed with that. I
    finally began taking about Glucosamine Chondroitin on a daily
    basis. Today I can finally get some sleep without the pain getting
    to me.

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I had
    in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it more and
    more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:

    I never played on any high school or college football teams. Sand lot,
    yeah, but didn't have time for a 'season' of football. Too busy with cars
    and the girls. While everybody was at the game, I was in the back seat
    of my 1940 Ford with Suzie Smith...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Wed Mar 20 15:15:10 2013
    On Wed Mar-20-2013 12:43, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    It looks different than the Lincoln.

    One is inline, the other is a V...

    Not what I meant. Accessing the spark plugs is what I was referring
    to.

    Shouldn't be too hard to do...

    That sounds familiar. (-:

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red Angel
    in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    It hasn't been charged or checked since last April.

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor
    is locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch
    at all. This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the
    engine runs hotter and that also affects emissions...

    If I don't stay active on a daily basis, an old hip injury from
    karate' class when I was 35, gives me joint pain ... that got to be
    so bad that I couldn't get comfortable, no matter what I tried.
    Heat pads helped, but I couldn't get into a waterbed with that. I
    finally began taking about Glucosamine Chondroitin on a daily
    basis. Today I can finally get some sleep without the pain getting
    to me.

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I had
    in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it more and
    more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:

    I never played on any high school or college football teams. Sand
    lot, yeah, but didn't have time for a 'season' of football. Too
    busy with cars and the girls. While everybody was at the game, I
    was in the back seat of my 1940 Ford with Suzie Smith...

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Thu Mar 21 08:10:00 2013
    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor is RW>locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch at all. RW>This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the engine runs RW>hotter and that also affects emissions...

    So you are tellng us that IF the computer system sees an undercharges AC
    system the radiator fan is NO longer controled by the engine block
    temperature sensor??

    I do not believe that.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom Strkes Again
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Thu Mar 21 11:38:15 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor
    is locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch
    at all. This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the
    engine runs hotter and that also affects emissions...

    So you are tellng us that IF the computer system sees an undercharges
    AC system the radiator fan is NO longer controled by the engine block temperature sensor??

    That is my experience, yes.

    I do not believe that.

    Believe what you will. When the compressor on my Z28 leaked all of the
    freon and the compressor oil, the engine over heated because the radiator
    fans were not engaging. Checking the engine coolant tank, it was full. The engine cooled down after the vehicle began to move, but when in traffic,
    the fans didn't engage when the temp gauge got to where they usually do
    engage. Refilling the AC system, the fans began to work as usual.

    Dunno why they build them that way, but the above is fact and not fiction.

    Looking at the schematic, today's AC systems are tied to the PCM through sensors on the AC refrigerant pressure sensor and evaporator tempurature sensor. The PCM also controls the AC compressor relay (clutch) and an AC malfunction indicator on the dash. Tracing beyond the PCM is impossible,
    unless you have a schematic of the PCM's inner circuits. Not even factory manuals have that feature. Aftermarket manuals won't even go into the AC system, as the system can be dangerous for the ordinary mechanic to work
    on. They refer you to a certified AC technician.

    If you have a better explanation, I'm all ears.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 21 12:06:41 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    It looks different than the Lincoln.
    One is inline, the other is a V...

    Not what I meant. Accessing the spark plugs is what I was referring
    to.

    Shouldn't be too hard to do...

    That sounds familiar. (-:

    It isn't a Blue Flame 6cyl Chevy, it's a 94 MB with all kinds of covers
    over everything. i.e. Corvettes have coil covers, but if you remove the
    covers, the engine doesn't look any different than what is in a Z28. The
    covers are there to 'beautify' the engine for the novice engine looker.

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red
    Angel in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    It hasn't been charged or checked since last April.

    Does the AC work?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor
    is locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch
    at all. This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the
    engine runs hotter and that also affects emissions...

    If I don't stay active on a daily basis, an old hip injury from
    karate' class when I was 35, gives me joint pain ... that got to be
    so bad that I couldn't get comfortable, no matter what I tried.
    Heat pads helped, but I couldn't get into a waterbed with that. I
    finally began taking about Glucosamine Chondroitin on a daily
    basis. Today I can finally get some sleep without the pain getting
    to me.

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I had
    in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it more and
    more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:

    I never played on any high school or college football teams. Sand
    lot, yeah, but didn't have time for a 'season' of football. Too
    busy with cars and the girls. While everybody was at the game, I
    was in the back seat of my 1940 Ford with Suzie Smith...

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to buy a
    new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I followed my
    father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48) Chevy (big back
    seats), but then, those weren't up to my expectations of a real car at
    the time...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Thu Mar 21 16:29:04 2013
    On Thu Mar-21-2013 12:06, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Shouldn't be too hard to do...

    That sounds familiar. (-:

    It isn't a Blue Flame 6cyl Chevy, it's a 94 MB with all kinds of
    covers over everything. i.e. Corvettes have coil covers, but if you
    remove the covers, the engine doesn't look any different than what
    is in a Z28. The covers are there to 'beautify' the engine for the
    novice engine looker.

    Hey! (-:

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red
    Angel in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    It hasn't been charged or checked since last April.

    Does the AC work?

    It will as soon as I recharge it.

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I had
    in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it more and
    more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:

    I never played on any high school or college football teams. Sand
    lot, yeah, but didn't have time for a 'season' of football. Too
    busy with cars and the girls. While everybody was at the game, I
    was in the back seat of my 1940 Ford with Suzie Smith...

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to
    buy a new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I
    followed my father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48)
    Chevy (big back seats), but then, those weren't up to my
    expectations of a real car at the time...

    That was my first new car. My first car was a Jeep station wagon w/4 wheel drive. I forget what year it was now, but I bought it from my boss at the time
    and although it was dependable, it was top heavy, so I had to slow down going around sharp curves lest it turn over.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Fri Mar 22 07:20:00 2013
    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the compressor RW>> is locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't engage the clutch RW>> at all. This affects the cooling fans and when they come on, the
    engine runs hotter and that also affects emissions...

    IT lowers the emmissions, In fact California requites a higher
    engine temperture to LOWER the enissions

    So you are tellng us
    that IF the computer system sees an undercharges RW> TW> AC system the
    radiator fan is NO longer controled by the engine block RW> TW>
    temperature sensor??

    That is my experience, yes.

    I do not believe that.

    Believe what you will. When the compressor on my Z28 leaked all of the RW>freon and the compressor oil, the engine over heated because the radiator RW>fans were not engaging. Checking the engine coolant tank, it was full. The RW>engine cooled down after the vehicle began to move, but when in traffic, RW>the fans didn't engage when the temp gauge got to where they usually do RW>engage. Refilling the AC system, the fans began to work as usual.

    Dunno why they build them that way, but the above is fact and not fiction.

    Looking at the schematic, today's AC systems are tied to the PCM through RW>sensors on the AC refrigerant pressure sensor and evaporator tempurature RW>sensor. The PCM also controls the AC compressor relay (clutch) and an AC RW>malfunction indicator on the dash. Tracing beyond the PCM is impossible, RW>unless you have a schematic of the PCM's inner circuits. Not even factory RW>manuals have that feature. Aftermarket manuals won't even go into the AC RW>system, as the system can be dangerous for the ordinary mechanic to work RW>on. They refer you to a certified AC technician.

    If you have a better explanation, I'm all ears.

    Well the Engine Block switch and the AC fan control are two seperate
    circuits and should not interfere with each other.

    NOT being a Chevrolet Fan I got this from www.camaroz28.com on coolant
    fan not runing if AC looses charge

    ****

    There are 7 things to consider:
    (the first 4 are ruled out because you said that the fan worked when the
    A/C was working.) Item 5; either the coolant temperature isn't reaching
    238°F, or faulty wiring to the relay. Item 6; ECM fan driver may be bad. unforunately the ECM will need replacing. Using an adjustable temp
    switch (for winter/summer) would save you the trouble of buying a new
    ECM, but you'll lose the control the ECM has for different conditions.

    Power
    Fan Fuse
    Fan Motor
    Fan Relay
    Coolant Fan Switch (on head) grounds the fan relay when temperature
    exceeds 238°F.
    ECM grounds the fan relay at programmed temperatures.
    There are four Fan settings in the ECM constants Table to turn the
    fan off and on.
    Faulty wiring

    GM programs a high operating temperature for lower emissions.
    Of the 9 binary files from ftp.diy-efi.org/pub/gmecm/bin_lib/1227165/6E
    folder 6 had the following settings: (I don't know if they're unmodified
    files)

    Turns Fan ON (A/C ON) 108°C (226.4°F) to keep the fan on when the
    A/C pressure is below 233psi.
    Turns Fan OFF (A/C OFF) 107°C (224.6°F)
    Turns Fan OFF (A/C ON) 105°C (221°F)
    Turns Fan ON (A/C OFF) 108°C (226.4°F)

    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ 0
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Fri Mar 22 11:18:06 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system,
    why?

    In today's cars, if there is no freon in the system, the
    compressor is locked out ot the system by the CPU and won't
    engage the clutch at all. This affects the cooling fans and
    when they come on, the engine runs hotter and that also affects RW>>> emissions...

    IT lowers the emmissions, In fact California requites a higher
    engine temperture to LOWER the enissions

    Nobody cares what CA requires, except law abiding Californians. The rest
    of us use lower temperature thermostats in our cars. I used a 180 in my
    Z28 when I lived in CA. Some people I knew at the time also had altered
    their exhaust to eliminate oxygen sensors in the exhaust, in an attempt to increase fuel/air ratios. Some even removed the cats...

    So you are tellng us

    that IF the computer system sees an undercharges RW> TW> AC system
    the radiator fan is NO longer controled by the engine block RW> TW> temperature sensor??

    That is my experience, yes.

    I do not believe that.

    Believe what you will. When the compressor on my Z28 leaked all of
    the freon and the compressor oil, the engine over heated because the
    radiator fans were not engaging. Checking the engine coolant tank,
    it was full. The engine cooled down after the vehicle began to move,
    but when in traffic, the fans didn't engage when the temp gauge got
    to where they usually do engage. Refilling the AC system, the fans
    began to work as usual.

    Dunno why they build them that way, but the above is fact and not
    fiction.

    Looking at the schematic, today's AC systems are tied to the PCM
    through sensors on the AC refrigerant pressure sensor and evaporator
    tempurature sensor. The PCM also controls the AC compressor relay
    (clutch) and an AC malfunction indicator on the dash. Tracing beyond
    the PCM is impossible, unless you have a schematic of the PCM's
    inner circuits. Not even factory manuals have that feature.
    Aftermarket manuals won't even go into the AC system, as the system
    can be dangerous for the ordinary mechanic to work on. They refer
    you to a certified AC technician.

    If you have a better explanation, I'm all ears.

    Well the Engine Block switch and the AC fan control are two seperate circuits and should not interfere with each other.

    After consulting the factory Service Manual, I'm going to stick by my statement.

    /quote
    Engine Electric Coolant Fans
    Coolant fan operation is crucial to the proper operation of the air conditioning system. The coolant fans ensure the proper amount of air flow acrosss the condenser throughout the vehicle operating range.

    Fan operation should be checked during any air conditioning diagnosis procedure. Special attention should be given to the fan wheneve excessive
    high side pressures are encountered.
    /unquote

    NOT being a Chevrolet Fan I got this from www.camaroz28.com on
    coolant fan not runing if AC looses charge

    ****

    There are 7 things to consider:
    (the first 4 are ruled out because you said that the fan worked when
    the A/C was working.) Item 5; either the coolant temperature isn't reaching 238°F, or faulty wiring to the relay. Item 6; ECM fan driver
    may be bad. unforunately the ECM will need replacing. Using an
    adjustable temp switch (for winter/summer) would save you the trouble
    of buying a new ECM, but you'll lose the control the ECM has for
    different conditions.

    Neither of these are what is happening. The coolant temp doesn't ever go
    to 238F in any case. Even if you have a factory 195F thermostat, it won't
    go that high. And, since the system works as it is supposed to work when
    it is charged, I don't believe for a minute that there is anything wrong
    with the system (other than a system leak).

    You cannot perform a fan operation check without certain diagnostic tools,
    as specified by GM.

    The first order of business when checking the AC system is to do an engine
    off check of AC system pressures. In this instance, the first check leads
    to "Both pressures (high and low side) below 10psi - which calls for ADD
    1lb of R134a, leak check system, repair leak. After performing this step,
    if you have pressures in both sides of the system of 50psi, the system is
    OK for the next diagnostic check.

    Which is a system check with the engine running and the AC system on.
    Since the system works as it is supposed to when the system is charged, al
    that remains to be done is to find and repair the leak.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Fri Mar 22 11:26:32 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    It isn't a Blue Flame 6cyl Chevy, it's a 94 MB with all kinds of
    covers over everything. i.e. Corvettes have coil covers, but if you
    remove the covers, the engine doesn't look any different than what
    is in a Z28. The covers are there to 'beautify' the engine for the
    novice engine looker.

    Hey! (-:

    FYI, my friend Harry would turn MB jobs away because he wasn't inclined to
    work on them. He was even reluctant to take a MB for free that somebody
    paid the towing fees on to get it out of their yard. Harry fixed it, but
    didn't want anything more to do with it and put a for sale sign on it.

    Last I saw of it was when the new owner drove it off after it had sat at
    the shop for months with that for sale sign on it. He brought it back the
    next day, wanting Harry to do some work on it. Harry declined to even
    listen to what the guy wanted done.

    Dunno why but any other German made cars (except V8 Porche') were
    acceptabe to work on. The real money is in fixing Asian cars because
    they're plentiful and so easy to diagnose and fix compared to European
    cars.

    While you're at it, you might want to get a black light and find
    your freon leak...

    I don't believe there is one. The MB is the car we put the Red
    Angel in. However, I'll check it to be sure.

    So, you're just now getting around to re-charging the system, why?

    It hasn't been charged or checked since last April.

    Does the AC work?

    It will as soon as I recharge it.

    8^)

    I never took any martial arts classes. I figured the training I
    had in football would be enough, but as the body gets older, it
    more and more refuses to do what the mind tells it to do. (-:

    I never played on any high school or college football teams. Sand
    lot, yeah, but didn't have time for a 'season' of football. Too
    busy with cars and the girls. While everybody was at the game, I
    was in the back seat of my 1940 Ford with Suzie Smith...

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to
    buy a new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I
    followed my father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48)
    Chevy (big back seats), but then, those weren't up to my
    expectations of a real car at the time...

    That was my first new car. My first car was a Jeep station wagon w/4 wheel drive. I forget what year it was now, but I bought it from my
    boss at the time and although it was dependable, it was top heavy, so
    I had to slow down going around sharp curves lest it turn over.

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe tudor,
    maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Sat Mar 23 07:52:00 2013
    IT lowers the emmissions, In fact California requites a higher
    engine temperture to LOWER the enissions

    Nobody cares what CA requires, except law abiding Californians. The rest RW>of us use lower temperature thermostats in our cars. I used a 180 in my RW>Z28 when I lived in CA. Some people I knew at the time also had altered RW>their exhaust to eliminate oxygen sensors in the exhaust, in an attempt to RW>increase fuel/air ratios. Some even removed the cats...

    You made a statement "implying" that Higher Engine temperature Raises Emissions. I mearly rebutted that statement saying it actualy LOWERS
    it.

    If you have a better explanation, I'm all ears.

    Well the Engine Block switch and the AC fan control are two seperate circuits and should not interfere with each other.

    After consulting the factory Service Manual, I'm going to stick by my RW>statement.

    /quote
    Engine Electric Coolant Fans
    Coolant fan operation is crucial to the proper operation of the air
    conditioning system. The coolant fans ensure the proper amount of air flow RW>acrosss the condenser throughout the vehicle operating range.

    Fan operation should be checked during any air conditioning diagnosis
    procedure. Special attention should be given to the fan wheneve excessive RW>high side pressures are encountered.
    /unquote

    That quote has nothing to do with the Engine Block heat switch and the operation of the Fan to pervent engine overheating.
    IF your FAN was not responding the the engine block temperature switch
    you had ANOTHER problem totally indepebndent to what the AC system was reporting.

    NOT being a Chevrolet Fan I got this from www.camaroz28.com on
    coolant fan not runing if AC looses charge

    ****

    There are 7 things to consider:
    (the first 4 are ruled out because you said that the fan worked when the A/C was working.) Item 5; either the coolant temperature isn't reaching 238°F, or faulty wiring to the relay. Item 6; ECM fan driver may be bad. unforunately the ECM will need replacing. Using an adjustable temp switch (for winter/summer) would save you the trouble of buying a new ECM, but you'll lose the control the ECM has for different conditions.

    Neither of these are what is happening. The coolant temp doesn't ever go RW>to 238F in any case. Even if you have a factory 195F thermostat, it won't RW>go that high. And, since the system works as it is supposed to work when RW>it is charged, I don't believe for a minute that there is anything wrong RW>with the system (other than a system leak).

    You cannot perform a fan operation check without certain diagnostic tools, RW>as specified by GM.

    Than why is it suggested you Ground the Wire GOING to the Block Fan
    switch to see if the FAN would run? WHICH it should, THEIR WORDS
    NOT MINE!!!!
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sun Mar 24 08:41:43 2013
    On Fri Mar-22-2013 11:26, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    FYI, my friend Harry would turn MB jobs away because he wasn't
    inclined to work on them. He was even reluctant to take a MB for
    free that somebody paid the towing fees on to get it out of their
    yard. Harry fixed it, but didn't want anything more to do with it
    and put a for sale sign on it.

    Well, if y'all ever come across any MBs in the mid-Nineties range that the owner wants to give away, I'll take them. I can always use extra parts. After all, the repair manual on them for that year range is $140, so you can imagine what the replacement parts cost.

    Last I saw of it was when the new owner drove it off after it had
    sat at the shop for months with that for sale sign on it. He
    brought it back the next day, wanting Harry to do some work on it.
    Harry declined to even listen to what the guy wanted done.

    I found a reliable shop here that can do the things I'm not able to do on the Mercedes. I'd like it to be my Lincoln mechanics, but they told me the only foreign car they would work on is a Toyota. I didn't ask why.

    Dunno why but any other German made cars (except V8 Porche') were acceptabe to work on. The real money is in fixing Asian cars
    because they're plentiful and so easy to diagnose and fix compared
    to European cars.

    My Lincoln mechanics told me last week they can't get a response out of my Mark
    VIII's computer. That tells me I can no longer trust the guy my SIL has known for a long time and has done so much for him. Once I find I can't trust someone, I forget I know that person.

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to
    buy a new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I
    followed my father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48)
    Chevy (big back seats), but then, those weren't up to my
    expectations of a real car at the time...

    I had a difficult time getting it because I had no credit background, but the salesman moved heaven and earth to push the sale through. It was a 2-door coupe and truquoise in color -- a beautiful car. The dealership didn't have that color in stock, so they tried to talk me into a green 4-door sedan with the powerpack 283 engine, which was the same engine I had exceot it had a 4-bbl
    carb instead of a 2-bbl. I flatly refused. When I finished with mine, it had 3 dueces atop an Edelbrock manifold (altered by me) and an Engel 3/4 race cam and a Mallory dual-point distributor. The original short block was replaced with a Corvette block with 10:1 compression. After I had the heads milled, I could almost outrun everything top end except police radios. (-:[

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe
    tudor, maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded
    it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.

    The new Jeeps are somewhat of a disappointment, if you believe what's plastered
    on the Internet. I'd like to have a Pontiac "Goat".


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Sun Mar 24 11:26:26 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    IT lowers the emmissions, In fact California requites a higher
    engine temperture to LOWER the enissions

    Nobody cares what CA requires, except law abiding Californians. The
    rest of us use lower temperature thermostats in our cars. I used a
    180 in my Z28 when I lived in CA. Some people I knew at the time
    also had altered their exhaust to eliminate oxygen sensors in the
    exhaust, in an attempt to increase fuel/air ratios. Some even
    removed the cats...

    You made a statement "implying" that Higher Engine temperature Raises Emissions. I mearly rebutted that statement saying it actualy LOWERS
    it.

    I didn't say any such thing. Not to mention that all of those guys who
    have 180 thermostats in their cars and have removed the Cats still pass emissions tests, IN CALIFORNIA...if the test stations even thought that a
    Cat was removed, the cars wouldn't pass the visual check.

    If you have a better explanation, I'm all ears.

    Well the Engine Block switch and the AC fan control are two
    seperate circuits and should not interfere with each other.

    After consulting the factory Service Manual, I'm going to stick by
    my statement.

    /quote
    Engine Electric Coolant Fans
    Coolant fan operation is crucial to the proper operation of the air
    conditioning system. The coolant fans ensure the proper amount of
    air flow acrosss the condenser throughout the vehicle operating
    range.

    Fan operation should be checked during any air conditioning
    diagnosis procedure. Special attention should be given to the fan
    wheneve excessive high side pressures are encountered. /unquote

    That quote has nothing to do with the Engine Block heat switch and
    the operation of the Fan to pervent engine overheating.

    On the contrary...

    IF your FAN was not responding the the engine block temperature
    switch you had ANOTHER problem totally indepebndent to what the AC
    system was reporting.

    Wrong.

    NOT being a Chevrolet Fan I got this from www.camaroz28.com on
    coolant fan not runing if AC looses charge

    ****

    There are 7 things to consider:
    (the first 4 are ruled out because you said that the fan worked
    when the A/C was working.) Item 5; either the coolant
    temperature isn't reaching 238°F, or faulty wiring to the relay.
    Item 6; ECM fan driver may be bad. unforunately the ECM will
    need replacing. Using an adjustable temp switch (for
    winter/summer) would save you the trouble of buying a new ECM,
    but you'll lose the control the ECM has for different
    conditions.

    Neither of these are what is happening. The coolant temp doesn't
    ever go to 238F in any case. Even if you have a factory 195F
    thermostat, it won't go that high. And, since the system works as it
    is supposed to work when it is charged, I don't believe for a minute
    that there is anything wrong with the system (other than a system
    leak).

    You cannot perform a fan operation check without certain diagnostic
    tools, as specified by GM.

    Than why is it suggested you Ground the Wire GOING to the Block Fan
    switch to see if the FAN would run?

    You must be using older, before OBD I, information.

    WHICH it should, THEIR WORDS NOT MINE!!!!

    I'll use the 1998 Service Manual to diagnose and repair what their testing reveals...it specifically applies to the 1998 product rather than some
    generic unknown source.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Sun Mar 24 11:30:31 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    On Fri Mar-22-2013 11:26, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    FYI, my friend Harry would turn MB jobs away because he wasn't
    inclined to work on them. He was even reluctant to take a MB for
    free that somebody paid the towing fees on to get it out of their
    yard. Harry fixed it, but didn't want anything more to do with it
    and put a for sale sign on it.

    Well, if y'all ever come across any MBs in the mid-Nineties range
    that the owner wants to give away, I'll take them. I can always use
    extra parts. After all, the repair manual on them for that year range
    is $140, so you can imagine what the replacement parts cost.

    8^) IOW, over engineered and over priced...

    Last I saw of it was when the new owner drove it off after it had
    sat at the shop for months with that for sale sign on it. He
    brought it back the next day, wanting Harry to do some work on it.
    Harry declined to even listen to what the guy wanted done.

    I found a reliable shop here that can do the things I'm not able to
    do on the Mercedes. I'd like it to be my Lincoln mechanics, but they
    told me the only foreign car they would work on is a Toyota. I
    didn't ask why.

    Probably for the same reason Harry won't work on MBs. Toyotas are
    plentiful and always need repair. Which translates into work for the
    employees and money in the shop's tills. My friend Max in San Diego told
    me the same thing about why he would rather work on a 4 or 6 cyl car than
    a V8. Easier to work on and the pay is the same. His favorite was the BMW
    4 and 6 cyl...he certainly had a bunch of 3-series BMW parts cars in his storage lot and wouldn't hesitate to make an offer on one that a customer didn't want to pay to fix. He usually got them for the price of parts and
    labor and turned them around because he had so many extra parts on hand.

    Dunno why but any other German made cars (except V8 Porche') were
    acceptabe to work on. The real money is in fixing Asian cars
    because they're plentiful and so easy to diagnose and fix compared
    to European cars.

    My Lincoln mechanics told me last week they can't get a response out
    of my Mark VIII's computer. That tells me I can no longer trust the
    guy my SIL has known for a long time and has done so much for him.
    Once I find I can't trust someone, I forget I know that person.

    Perhaps your Mark 8's PCM has suffered a problem that can't be corrected
    unless it is repaired or replaced. If its a pre-OBD I PCM (as in
    pre-1996), the only thing that can be done for it is to replace the
    onboard chip that runs the PCM. Dunno about Ford products, but GM pre-OBD
    I PCMs have a removable chip. BTW, that chip can be tested outside of the computer.

    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to
    buy a new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I
    followed my father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48)
    Chevy (big back seats), but then, those weren't up to my
    expectations of a real car at the time...

    I had a difficult time getting it because I had no credit background,
    but the salesman moved heaven and earth to push the sale through. It
    was a 2-door coupe and truquoise in color -- a beautiful car. The dealership didn't have that color in stock, so they tried to talk me
    into a green 4-door sedan with the powerpack 283 engine, which was
    the same engine I had exceot it had a 4-bbl carb instead of a 2-bbl.
    I flatly refused. When I finished with mine, it had 3 dueces atop an Edelbrock manifold (altered by me) and an Engel 3/4 race cam and a
    Mallory dual-point distributor. The original short block was
    replaced with a Corvette block with 10:1 compression.

    It'd be nice to know the specs on that cam...lift, duration, etc..

    After I had the heads milled, I could almost outrun everything top
    end except police radios. (-:[

    I did that once in my Corvette. The cop that came over the center-divide
    on Clairmont Dr probably caught up with the Dodge Charger I was racing,
    but never caught up with me. I dunno if he caught the Dodge or not since I didn't go back to find out.

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe
    tudor, maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded
    it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.

    The new Jeeps are somewhat of a disappointment, if you believe what's plastered on the Internet. I'd like to have a Pontiac "Goat".

    I just got a glimpse of a 2014 Siverado. Standard cab, shortbed with a
    6.2L LS engine and 6spd automatic. Wish I didn't like my 'paid for' 2002
    so much.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sun Mar 24 13:36:39 2013
    On Sun Mar-24-2013 11:30, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Well, if y'all ever come across any MBs in the mid-Nineties range
    that the owner wants to give away, I'll take them. I can always use
    extra parts. After all, the repair manual on them for that year range
    is $140, so you can imagine what the replacement parts cost.

    8^) IOW, over engineered and over priced...

    You're probably right.

    I found a reliable shop here that can do the things I'm not able to
    do on the Mercedes. I'd like it to be my Lincoln mechanics, but they
    told me the only foreign car they would work on is a Toyota. I
    didn't ask why.

    Probably for the same reason Harry won't work on MBs. Toyotas are plentiful and always need repair. Which translates into work for
    the employees and money in the shop's tills. My friend Max in San
    Diego told me the same thing about why he would rather work on a 4
    or 6 cyl car than a V8. Easier to work on and the pay is the same.
    His favorite was the BMW 4 and 6 cyl...he certainly had a bunch of 3-series BMW parts cars in his storage lot and wouldn't hesitate to
    make an offer on one that a customer didn't want to pay to fix. He
    usually got them for the price of parts and labor and turned them
    around because he had so many extra parts on hand.

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.

    My Lincoln mechanics told me last week they can't get a response out
    of my Mark VIII's computer. That tells me I can no longer trust the
    guy my SIL has known for a long time and has done so much for him.
    Once I find I can't trust someone, I forget I know that person.

    Perhaps your Mark 8's PCM has suffered a problem that can't be
    corrected unless it is repaired or replaced. If its a pre-OBD I PCM
    (as in pre-1996), the only thing that can be done for it is to
    replace the onboard chip that runs the PCM. Dunno about Ford
    products, but GM pre-OBD I PCMs have a removable chip. BTW, that
    chip can be tested outside of the computer.

    I don't know what it is either, but I'll find out tomorrow when I go to their shop to check on it.

    I was a high school student in that year. Not having the income to
    buy a new Chevy, I opted for a $50 V8 Ford. I suppose that had I
    followed my father's advice, I would have bought a fat body (41-48)
    Chevy (big back seats), but then, those weren't up to my
    expectations of a real car at the time...

    I had a difficult time getting it because I had no credit background,
    but the salesman moved heaven and earth to push the sale through. It
    was a 2-door coupe and truquoise in color -- a beautiful car. The dealership didn't have that color in stock, so they tried to talk me
    into a green 4-door sedan with the powerpack 283 engine, which was
    the same engine I had exceot it had a 4-bbl carb instead of a 2-bbl.
    I flatly refused. When I finished with mine, it had 3 dueces atop an Edelbrock manifold (altered by me) and an Engel 3/4 race cam and a
    Mallory dual-point distributor. The original short block was
    replaced with a Corvette block with 10:1 compression.

    It'd be nice to know the specs on that cam...lift, duration, etc..

    I don't remember anything specifically about that car except I had a lot of fun
    in it. (-: I doubt if a 1957 Engel cam can be googled, but am uncertain.

    After I had the heads milled, I could almost outrun everything top
    end except police radios. (-:[

    I did that once in my Corvette. The cop that came over the
    center-divide on Clairmont Dr probably caught up with the Dodge
    Charger I was racing, but never caught up with me. I dunno if he
    caught the Dodge or not since I didn't go back to find out.

    They got me on the Highway 11 bridge across lake Pontchartrain between New Orleans and Slidell.

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe
    tudor, maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded
    it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.

    The new Jeeps are somewhat of a disappointment, if you believe what's plastered on the Internet. I'd like to have a Pontiac "Goat".

    I just got a glimpse of a 2014 Siverado. Standard cab, shortbed
    with a 6.2L LS engine and 6spd automatic. Wish I didn't like my
    'paid for' 2002 so much.

    Now is not the time to go into debt again, but only you can make that decision.

    Did you like that last picture I sent?


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Mon Mar 25 15:22:00 2013
    IF your FAN was not responding the the engine block temperature
    switch you had ANOTHER problem totally indepebndent to what the AC system was reporting.

    I'll use the 1998 Service Manual to diagnose and repair what their testing RW>reveals...it specifically applies to the 1998 product rather than some RW>generic unknown source.

    From the service manual of a 1998 5.7L F-car (Camaro/Firebird) here is
    the descriptio of the cooling fan controls

    Engine Cooling Fan Description - Electric
    The electric cooling fans are used to cool engine coolant flowing
    through the radiator. The fans are also used to cool the refrigerant
    flowing through the A/C condenser.

    The electric cooling fans are controlled by the PCM. The PCM controls
    the ground path for the three cooling fan relays. The relays are used to control the high current flow to power the cooling fan motors. Both fans operate together. When minimum cooling is required, the PCM energizes
    cooling fan relay #1 and both fans operate at low speed, since the fans
    are connected in series through cooling fan relay #3. Cooling fan relay
    #2 is open (not energized) and is not used for low speed operation of
    the fans. When maximum cooling is required, the PCM energizes all three
    cooling fan relays. The left fan is still powered through cooling fan
    relay #1, but is now grounded through cooling fan relay #3. The right
    fan is now powered directly through cooling fan relay #2 and both fans
    operated at high speed.

    The PCM will also enable the cooling fans after the ignition is turned
    off. When the engine coolant temperature exceeds 113°C (235°F) and the
    ignition is turned off, the cooling fans will be enabled on low speed
    for 150 seconds.

    Cooling Fans
    The cooling fans are controlled by the PCM based on the
    following inputs:

    The A/C system.
    The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor.
    The Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS).

    Looks like SEPERATE Functions to me controled by a combination of
    Sensors and Relays.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Thu Mar 28 10:01:16 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    Mine says the same thing. It even has 4 stages of procedures to check the
    AC system. However, it doesn't have a procedure to check out why the
    radiator fans don't engage as the engine temps get higher than normal
    operating temps when the PCM detects that the system is low on freon.

    From the service manual of a 1998 5.7L F-car (Camaro/Firebird) here
    is the descriptio of the cooling fan controls

    Engine Cooling Fan Description - Electric
    The electric cooling fans are used to cool engine coolant flowing
    through the radiator. The fans are also used to cool the refrigerant flowing through the A/C condenser.

    The electric cooling fans are controlled by the PCM. The PCM controls
    the ground path for the three cooling fan relays. The relays are used
    to control the high current flow to power the cooling fan motors.
    Both fans operate together. When minimum cooling is required, the PCM energizes cooling fan relay #1 and both fans operate at low speed,
    since the fans are connected in series through cooling fan relay #3. Cooling fan relay #2 is open (not energized) and is not used for low
    speed operation of the fans. When maximum cooling is required, the
    PCM energizes all three cooling fan relays. The left fan is still
    powered through cooling fan relay #1, but is now grounded through
    cooling fan relay #3. The right fan is now powered directly through cooling fan relay #2 and both fans operated at high speed.

    The PCM will also enable the cooling fans after the ignition is
    turned off. When the engine coolant temperature exceeds 113°C (235°F)
    and the ignition is turned off, the cooling fans will be enabled on
    low speed for 150 seconds.

    Cooling Fans
    The cooling fans are controlled by the PCM based on the
    following inputs:

    The A/C system.
    The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor.
    The Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS).

    Looks like SEPERATE Functions to me controled by a combination of
    Sensors and Relays.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)

    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 28 10:07:57 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.

    Sad...really sad.

    It'd be nice to know the specs on that cam...lift, duration, etc..

    I don't remember anything specifically about that car except I had a
    lot of fun in it. (-: I doubt if a 1957 Engel cam can be googled,
    but am uncertain.

    You could probably get the specs from Engel, if they still exist.

    After I had the heads milled, I could almost outrun everything top
    end except police radios. (-:[

    I did that once in my Corvette. The cop that came over the
    center-divide on Clairmont Dr probably caught up with the Dodge
    Charger I was racing, but never caught up with me. I dunno if he
    caught the Dodge or not since I didn't go back to find out.

    They got me on the Highway 11 bridge across lake Pontchartrain
    between New Orleans and Slidell.

    You mean they got you where there was no place to elude them.

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe
    tudor, maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded
    it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.

    The new Jeeps are somewhat of a disappointment, if you believe
    what's plastered on the Internet. I'd like to have a Pontiac
    "Goat".

    I just got a glimpse of a 2014 Siverado. Standard cab, shortbed
    with a 6.2L LS engine and 6spd automatic. Wish I didn't like my
    'paid for' 2002 so much.

    Now is not the time to go into debt again, but only you can make that decision.

    I wouldn't be in debt, but my stock/interest income would be impaired for
    a while.

    Did you like that last picture I sent?

    The one that said; The L.A. Zoo has an African lion, the White House has a lyin' African 8^) yeup.

    Closer to home (Chicago) it would read; The Brookfield Zoo has an African
    Lion, etc...



    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Thu Mar 28 12:17:58 2013
    On Thu Mar-28-2013 10:07, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.

    Sad...really sad.

    Why is that? This MB has a little over 191k on it and runs like a jackrabbit.
    It doesn't have the overpowering V-8 the Mark VIII has, but for the driving I do, it is more than adequate.

    It'd be nice to know the specs on that cam...lift, duration, etc..

    I don't remember anything specifically about that car except I had a
    lot of fun in it. (-: I doubt if a 1957 Engel cam can be googled,
    but am uncertain.

    You could probably get the specs from Engel, if they still exist.

    They do.

    After I had the heads milled, I could almost outrun everything top
    end except police radios. (-:[

    I did that once in my Corvette. The cop that came over the
    center-divide on Clairmont Dr probably caught up with the Dodge
    Charger I was racing, but never caught up with me. I dunno if he
    caught the Dodge or not since I didn't go back to find out.

    They got me on the Highway 11 bridge across lake Pontchartrain
    between New Orleans and Slidell.

    You mean they got you where there was no place to elude them.

    Yes. (-:

    That was my grandfather's first new car too. A 1941 Chevy Deluxe
    tudor, maroon. I always wanted that car, but he eventually traded
    it in for a 52 Pontiac, maroon in color.

    The new Jeeps are somewhat of a disappointment, if you believe
    what's plastered on the Internet. I'd like to have a Pontiac
    "Goat".

    I just got a glimpse of a 2014 Siverado. Standard cab, shortbed
    with a 6.2L LS engine and 6spd automatic. Wish I didn't like my
    'paid for' 2002 so much.

    Now is not the time to go into debt again, but only you can make that decision.

    I wouldn't be in debt, but my stock/interest income would be
    impaired for a while.

    Did you like that last picture I sent?

    The one that said; The L.A. Zoo has an African lion, the White
    House has a lyin' African 8^) yeup.

    Did I send the one with the black smoke coming from the White House chimneys?

    Closer to home (Chicago) it would read; The Brookfield Zoo has an
    African Lion, etc...

    LOL!


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Fri Mar 29 11:18:00 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    Mine says the same thing. It even has 4 stages of procedures to check the RW>AC system. However, it doesn't have a procedure to check out why the RW>radiator fans don't engage as the engine temps get higher than normal RW>operating temps when the PCM detects that the system is low on freon.

    Since the Engine temperature function has priority so the fans should
    have run in high speed. Since it did not it indicatas either a bad
    engine block sensor, a problem with one of the Relays, or an unusual
    problem with the vehicle speed input to the PCM.

    From the service manual of a 1998 5.7L F-car (Camaro/Firebird) here
    is the descriptio of the cooling fan controls

    Engine Cooling Fan Description - Electric
    The electric cooling fans are used to cool engine coolant flowing through the radiator. The fans are also used to cool the refrigerant flowing through the A/C condenser.

    The electric cooling fans are controlled by the PCM. The PCM controls the ground path for the three cooling fan relays. The relays are used to control the high current flow to power the cooling fan motors.
    Both fans operate together. When minimum cooling is required, the PCM energizes cooling fan relay #1 and both fans operate at low speed, since the fans are connected in series through cooling fan relay #3. Cooling fan relay #2 is open (not energized) and is not used for low speed operation of the fans. When maximum cooling is required, the
    PCM energizes all three cooling fan relays. The left fan is still powered through cooling fan relay #1, but is now grounded through cooling fan relay #3. The right fan is now powered directly through cooling fan relay #2 and both fans operated at high speed.

    The PCM will also enable the cooling fans after the ignition is
    turned off. When the engine coolant temperature exceeds 113°C (235°F) and the ignition is turned off, the cooling fans will be enabled on
    low speed for 150 seconds.

    Cooling Fans
    The cooling fans are controlled by the PCM based on the
    following inputs:

    The A/C system.
    The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor.
    The Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS).

    Looks like SEPERATE Functions to me controled by a combination of Sensors and Relays.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)

    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom Strkes Again
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Fri Mar 29 11:48:07 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.
    Sad...really sad.
    Why is that?

    I find that a 4 cyl car leaves a lot to be desired.

    This MB has a little over 191k on it and runs like a jackrabbit.

    That makes my 94k mile Z28 run like a stripped-ass ape! Wanna race? Don't mention superior gas mileage either.

    It doesn't have the overpowering V-8 the Mark VIII has, but for the driving I do, it is more than adequate.

    So were Model-Ts back in their day. Then along came 1932 and changed it
    all.

    You could probably get the specs from Engel, if they still exist.

    They do.

    Lobe seperation angle, lift and duration...

    Did you like that last picture I sent?

    The one that said; The L.A. Zoo has an African lion, the White
    House has a lyin' African 8^) yeup.

    Did I send the one with the black smoke coming from the White House chimneys?

    Yeup.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Fri Mar 29 11:50:42 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    Mine says the same thing. It even has 4 stages of procedures to
    check the AC system. However, it doesn't have a procedure to check
    out why the radiator fans don't engage as the engine temps get
    higher than normal operating temps when the PCM detects that the
    system is low on freon.

    Since the Engine temperature function has priority so the fans should
    have run in high speed. Since it did not it indicatas either a bad
    engine block sensor, a problem with one of the Relays, or an unusual problem with the vehicle speed input to the PCM.

    Since all of it works as designed with a full load of freon, I have my
    doubts about your diagnoses.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sat Mar 30 08:03:34 2013
    On Fri Mar-29-2013 11:48, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.
    Sad...really sad.

    Why is that?

    I find that a 4 cyl car leaves a lot to be desired.

    If I were 20 years old, I would agree. (-:

    This MB has a little over 191k on it and runs like a jackrabbit.

    That makes my 94k mile Z28 run like a stripped-ass ape! Wanna race?

    That has to be a rhetorical question.

    Don't mention superior gas mileage either.

    I'm doing alright. My only gripe is I have to use premium gas, i.e., 93 octane.

    It doesn't have the overpowering V-8 the Mark VIII has, but for the driving I do, it is more than adequate.

    So were Model-Ts back in their day. Then along came 1932 and
    changed it all.

    (-:

    You could probably get the specs from Engel, if they still exist.

    They do.

    Lobe seperation angle, lift and duration...

    I believe anyone could get the specs if I spelled Engle correctly. (-:

    Did you like that last picture I sent?

    The one that said; The L.A. Zoo has an African lion, the White
    House has a lyin' African 8^) yeup.

    Did I send the one with the black smoke coming from the White House chimneys?

    Yeup.

    Glad you liked them.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Sat Mar 30 09:33:01 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    My Mercedes is a 4-cyl.
    Sad...really sad.

    Why is that?

    I find that a 4 cyl car leaves a lot to be desired.

    If I were 20 years old, I would agree. (-:

    It's not the age that makes the difference, it's the mentality.

    This MB has a little over 191k on it and runs like a jackrabbit.

    That makes my 94k mile Z28 run like a stripped-ass ape! Wanna race?

    That has to be a rhetorical question.

    Think about it and there won't be any question about it.

    Don't mention superior gas mileage either.

    I'm doing alright. My only gripe is I have to use premium gas, i.e.,
    93 octane.

    MPG?

    I was headed for Illinois to see my mother on her birthday when my friend Andrew told me that he was packing up for a trip to see his mother in Minnesota. I was taking the Z28, he was taking his 94 Nissan (v6, auto-overdrive - Altima?). We started out together and he thought he could
    go past the gas station that I'd have to make a stop at. I kept on going
    for as long as he did, then when he pulled into a station for a fill up I
    did too. The Z took .23 gallons more than his Nissan, both getting the
    same mileage out of a 15 gallon tank. Coulda pushed him over with a
    feather that day. Then I told him I'd like to drive over the speed limit,
    which cause his Nissan to burn more gas while the Z was slumbering along
    at 1800 rpm doing 70mph.

    It doesn't have the overpowering V-8 the Mark VIII has, but for the
    driving I do, it is more than adequate.

    So were Model-Ts back in their day. Then along came 1932 and
    changed it all.

    (-:

    You could probably get the specs from Engel, if they still exist.

    They do.

    Lobe seperation angle, lift and duration...

    I believe anyone could get the specs if I spelled Engle correctly.
    (-:

    So you did a google already.

    Did you like that last picture I sent?

    The one that said; The L.A. Zoo has an African lion, the White
    House has a lyin' African 8^) yeup.

    Did I send the one with the black smoke coming from the White House
    chimneys?

    Yeup.

    Glad you liked them.

    I've got a couple from my BIL that I'll send along one of these days.

    Burma Shave type.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sun Mar 31 05:11:49 2013
    On Sat Mar-30-2013 09:33, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    If I were 20 years old, I would agree. (-:

    It's not the age that makes the difference, it's the mentality.

    Oh, the mentality is still there, but at the same time it is cognizant of the body's condition, else I'd have been riding my SIL's Harley long ago. A Trike is the fad here nowadays.

    Don't mention superior gas mileage either.

    I'm doing alright. My only gripe is I have to use premium gas, i.e.,
    93 octane.

    MPG?

    The MB? About 17MPG in the city. I rarely go out of town with it.

    I was headed for Illinois to see my mother on her birthday when my
    friend Andrew told me that he was packing up for a trip to see his
    mother in Minnesota. I was taking the Z28, he was taking his 94
    Nissan (v6, auto-overdrive - Altima?). We started out together and
    he thought he could go past the gas station that I'd have to make a
    stop at. I kept on going for as long as he did, then when he pulled
    into a station for a fill up I did too. The Z took .23 gallons more
    than his Nissan, both getting the same mileage out of a 15 gallon
    tank. Coulda pushed him over with a feather that day. Then I told
    him I'd like to drive over the speed limit, which cause his Nissan
    to burn more gas while the Z was slumbering along at 1800 rpm doing
    70mph.

    That's interesting. My Mark VIII gets over 30MPG at 1400RPM on the highway at 60 (usually the safest speed to go because the speed limits change suddenly and
    sometimes without warning). The MPG will increase slightly if I'm going north to south, but everyone laughs at me when I tell them that. (-:

    I believe anyone could get the specs if I spelled Engle correctly.
    (-:

    So you did a google already.

    Yes and no. There were too many hits and the one I was looking for wasn't on the first page.

    Glad you liked them.

    I've got a couple from my BIL that I'll send along one of these
    days.

    Burma Shave type.

    Alright.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROY WITT on Sun Mar 31 09:40:00 2013
    Mine says the same thing. It even has 4 stages of procedures to
    check the AC system. However, it doesn't have a procedure to check RW>> out why the radiator fans don't engage as the engine temps get
    higher than normal operating temps when the PCM detects that the
    system is low on freon.

    Since the Engine temperature function has priority so the fans should have run in high speed. Since it did not it indicatas either a bad engine block sensor, a problem with one of the Relays, or an unusual problem with the vehicle speed input to the PCM.

    Since all of it works as designed with a full load of freon, I have my RW>doubts about your diagnoses.

    Doubt al you wabnt. But the Circuit was designed so the Engine Bloc kTemperasture has Priority and should always run the fans no mater what
    the other sensors dictated.

    IF the Fans did not run when the engine cooling water reached the Set
    Temp for fan activaqtion there WAS a fault in the system
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Tue Apr 2 10:58:34 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    If I were 20 years old, I would agree. (-:

    It's not the age that makes the difference, it's the mentality.

    Oh, the mentality is still there, but at the same time it is
    cognizant of the body's condition, else I'd have been riding my SIL's Harley long ago. A Trike is the fad here nowadays.

    Backward trikes maybe. Certainly not HD trikes anymore.

    Don't mention superior gas mileage either.

    I'm doing alright. My only gripe is I have to use premium gas,
    i.e., 93 octane.

    MPG?

    The MB? About 17MPG in the city. I rarely go out of town with it.

    My Z has to use 93o as well. It gets about 15-16 in town. But I don't
    drive it very much anymore. Texas roads aren't built for performance suspensions, they're built for trucks. And the city streets have gone to
    hell because of the incompetence of the city manager. He was finally fired about two weeks ago. City Hall is crumbling around the council as it
    struggles to get out from under the rock they've been hiding under.

    I was headed for Illinois to see my mother on her birthday when my
    friend Andrew told me that he was packing up for a trip to see his
    mother in Minnesota. I was taking the Z28, he was taking his 94
    Nissan (v6, auto-overdrive - Altima?). We started out together and
    he thought he could go past the gas station that I'd have to make a
    stop at. I kept on going for as long as he did, then when he pulled
    into a station for a fill up I did too. The Z took .23 gallons more
    than his Nissan, both getting the same mileage out of a 15 gallon
    tank. Coulda pushed him over with a feather that day. Then I told
    him I'd like to drive over the speed limit, which cause his Nissan
    to burn more gas while the Z was slumbering along at 1800 rpm doing
    70mph.

    That's interesting. My Mark VIII gets over 30MPG at 1400RPM on the highway at 60 (usually the safest speed to go because the speed
    limits change suddenly and sometimes without warning).

    60mph would be on the cusp between 5th and 6th gear in the Z...1400rpm is
    too low in 6th and 60mph in 5th is over 1500rpm.

    The MPG will increase slightly if I'm going north to south, but
    everyone laughs at me when I tell them that. (-:

    Dunno why. 8^)


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Tue Apr 2 11:06:55 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROY WITT:

    Mine says the same thing. It even has 4 stages of procedures to RW>>> check the AC system. However, it doesn't have a procedure to
    check out why the radiator fans don't engage as the engine
    temps get higher than normal operating temps when the PCM
    detects that the system is low on freon.

    Since the Engine temperature function has priority so the fans
    should have run in high speed. Since it did not it indicatas
    either a bad engine block sensor, a problem with one of the
    Relays, or an unusual problem with the vehicle speed input to
    the PCM.

    Since all of it works as designed with a full load of freon, I have
    my doubts about your diagnoses.

    Doubt al you wabnt. But the Circuit was designed so the Engine Bloc kTemperasture has Priority and should always run the fans no mater
    what the other sensors dictated.

    IF the Fans did not run when the engine cooling water reached the Set
    Temp for fan activaqtion there WAS a fault in the system

    Lemme put it this way; if your scenario were true, there would be a fault
    code in the PCM...there is none.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Wed Apr 3 09:28:18 2013
    On Tue Apr-02-2013 10:58, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Oh, the mentality is still there, but at the same time it is
    cognizant of the body's condition, else I'd have been riding my SIL's Harley long ago. A Trike is the fad here nowadays.

    Backward trikes maybe. Certainly not HD trikes anymore.

    Right. I still couldn't afford one. (-:

    That's interesting. My Mark VIII gets over 30MPG at 1400RPM on the highway at 60 (usually the safest speed to go because the speed
    limits change suddenly and sometimes without warning).

    60mph would be on the cusp between 5th and 6th gear in the
    Z...1400rpm is too low in 6th and 60mph in 5th is over 1500rpm.

    I think one of the factors is the Mark VIII lowers itelf slightly at high speeds to reduce drag (the body is a sleek design) and the transmission is in overdrive, reducing the strain on the V-8.

    The MPG will increase slightly if I'm going north to south, but
    everyone laughs at me when I tell them that. (-:

    Dunno why. 8^)

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north Louisiana. The
    time to get there, since we're traveling south to north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself. I'll bet you notice the difference.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Wed Apr 3 13:08:03 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    Oh, the mentality is still there, but at the same time it is
    cognizant of the body's condition, else I'd have been riding my
    SIL's Harley long ago. A Trike is the fad here nowadays.

    Backward trikes maybe. Certainly not HD trikes anymore.

    Right. I still couldn't afford one. (-:

    I can't see the motorcycle rider's need for such a vehicle, unless one
    doesn't have any sense of balance.

    That's interesting. My Mark VIII gets over 30MPG at 1400RPM on the
    highway at 60 (usually the safest speed to go because the speed
    limits change suddenly and sometimes without warning).

    60mph would be on the cusp between 5th and 6th gear in the
    Z...1400rpm is too low in 6th and 60mph in 5th is over 1500rpm.

    I think one of the factors is the Mark VIII lowers itelf slightly at
    high speeds to reduce drag (the body is a sleek design) and the transmission is in overdrive, reducing the strain on the V-8.

    Since that isn't a torque motor, I don't get the impression that it would
    be anything but a strain on it. My mother used to drive a straight 8
    Pontiac with 3spd on the column. She'd take off from a stop sign and shift
    into 3rd gear before she got across the intersection. When I drove it, I
    wasn't in 3rd gear until way past the intersection. She was lugging that
    motor and I was letting it do its intended job. She told my dad about it
    and he said that I was right...I was only 15yo at that time.

    The MPG will increase slightly if I'm going north to south, but
    everyone laughs at me when I tell them that. (-:

    Dunno why. 8^)

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you were
    going south, that might be down hill. But just heading south from north
    isn't going down hill.

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north
    Louisiana. The time to get there, since we're traveling south to
    north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself. I'll
    bet you notice the difference.

    I've driven from here to Illinois and back. There is no difference...


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Wed Apr 3 15:31:21 2013
    On Wed Apr-03-2013 13:08, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Backward trikes maybe. Certainly not HD trikes anymore.

    Right. I still couldn't afford one. (-:

    I can't see the motorcycle rider's need for such a vehicle, unless
    one doesn't have any sense of balance.

    That would be me.

    I think one of the factors is the Mark VIII lowers itelf slightly at
    high speeds to reduce drag (the body is a sleek design) and the transmission is in overdrive, reducing the strain on the V-8.

    Since that isn't a torque motor, I don't get the impression that it
    would be anything but a strain on it.

    Mot sure what you mean by that, but it isn't important.

    My mother used to drive a straight 8 Pontiac with 3spd on the
    column. She'd take off from a stop sign and shift into 3rd gear
    before she got across the intersection. When I drove it, I wasn't
    in 3rd gear until way past the intersection. She was lugging that
    motor and I was letting it do its intended job. She told my dad
    about it and he said that I was right...I was only 15yo at that
    time.

    I could have done what she did without the clutch. 7:->]

    The MPG will increase slightly if I'm going north to south, but
    everyone laughs at me when I tell them that. (-:

    Dunno why. 8^)

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    There are no plateaus in Louisiana. (-: West Texas, maybe. Through no fault of mine, I haven't been that far west. Had I been single at the time, I would have gone to the California coast just to experience the lack of humidity.

    But just heading south from north isn't going down hill.

    Yes, it is. Think about the differences in sea level.

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north
    Louisiana. The time to get there, since we're traveling south to
    north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself. I'll
    bet you notice the difference.

    I've driven from here to Illinois and back. There is no
    difference...

    Did you average the same speed going and coming and not notice the difference?


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Fri Apr 5 11:27:22 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    I think one of the factors is the Mark VIII lowers itelf slightly at
    high speeds to reduce drag (the body is a sleek design) and the
    transmission is in overdrive, reducing the strain on the V-8.

    Since that isn't a torque motor, I don't get the impression that it
    would be anything but a strain on it.

    Mot sure what you mean by that, but it isn't important.

    Torque moves objects...HP is derived from a torque reading.

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    There are no plateaus in Louisiana. (-: West Texas, maybe.

    Central Texas...where I live is the very eastern edge of what is known
    here as the 'Hill Country'. I live in an area also known as South Central Texas...Driving south out of Dallas/FW area at first you go up hill, then
    it's down hill from there. D/FW is farther east than San Antonio. Houston
    is farther north and east of SA. San Antonio is farther south than NO...

    But, you're never going to be at or near sea level until you get to
    Corpus...

    Through no fault of mine, I haven't been that far west. Had I been single at the time, I would have gone to the California coast just to experience the lack of humidity.

    You don't have to go that far. SC Texas has no humidity, unless there is
    an offshore flow from the Gulf. You can be outside in the afternoon here
    and the temps may be 95F, but you won't feel it until the humidty reaches
    over 90% or more. That's pretty rare, as usually there is a breeze out of
    the north blowing off shore.

    But just heading south from north isn't going down hill.

    Yes, it is. Think about the differences in sea level.

    There is no difference here. There isn't any difference until you get to
    the tip of South America, where the Atlantic and Pacific meet. Of course
    this isn't the only place you can experience different ocean levels. This
    is why there are locks in the Panama Canal, so that ships can meet the
    levels of both oceans as they head west or east.

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north
    Louisiana. The time to get there, since we're traveling south to
    north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself. I'll
    bet you notice the difference.

    I've driven from here to Illinois and back. There is no
    difference...

    Did you average the same speed going and coming and not notice the difference?

    Same speed, same roads...I've tried several different routes and they all
    work out the same.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sun Apr 7 10:17:04 2013
    On Fri Apr-05-2013 11:27, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Mot sure what you mean by that, but it isn't important.

    Torque moves objects...HP is derived from a torque reading.

    Yes, but if I'm not careful in pressing the gas pedal, I'll be thrown into the back seat (not literally).

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    Yes, exactly.

    There are no plateaus in Louisiana. (-: West Texas, maybe.

    Central Texas...where I live is the very eastern edge of what is
    known here as the 'Hill Country'. I live in an area also known as
    South Central Texas...Driving south out of Dallas/FW area at first
    you go up hill, then it's down hill from there. D/FW is farther
    east than San Antonio. Houston is farther north and east of SA. San Antonio is farther south than NO...

    I've only been to four cities iun Texas (Baytown, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston),
    but have been through more and no farther west.

    But, you're never going to be at or near sea level until you get to Corpus...

    Or New Orleans. (-:

    Through no fault of mine, I haven't been that far west. Had I been single at the time, I would have gone to the California coast just to experience the lack of humidity.

    You don't have to go that far. SC Texas has no humidity, unless
    there is an offshore flow from the Gulf. You can be outside in the afternoon here and the temps may be 95F, but you won't feel it
    until the humidty reaches over 90% or more. That's pretty rare, as
    usually there is a breeze out of the north blowing off shore.

    There's another reason I didn't mention. I've only seen the Pacific Ocean in pictures. A couple of years from now, if not sooner, I'm going to take a trip to Las Vegas and from there go to see the Grand Canyon. My only regret will be
    I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    But just heading south from north isn't going down hill.

    Yes, it is. Think about the differences in sea level.

    There is no difference here. There isn't any difference until you
    get to the tip of South America, where the Atlantic and Pacific
    meet. Of course this isn't the only place you can experience
    different ocean levels. This is why there are locks in the Panama
    Canal, so that ships can meet the levels of both oceans as they
    head west or east.

    What a tangent! (-: Make that northwest and southeast.

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north
    Louisiana. The time to get there, since we're traveling south to
    north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself. I'll
    bet you notice the difference.

    I've driven from here to Illinois and back. There is no
    difference...

    I find that difficult to believe and since this didn't come up before you made the trip, you naturally wouldn't notice since you wouldn't have had that on your mind.

    Did you average the same speed going and coming and not notice the difference?

    Same speed, same roads...I've tried several different routes and
    they all work out the same.

    See above.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Sun Apr 7 11:36:10 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    Mot sure what you mean by that, but it isn't important.
    Torque moves objects...HP is derived from a torque reading.

    Yes, but if I'm not careful in pressing the gas pedal, I'll be thrown
    into the back seat (not literally).

    Too strong of a return spring on your gas pedal?

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    Yes, exactly.

    What if you're driving west from the white cliffs of Dover?

    There are no plateaus in Louisiana. (-: West Texas, maybe.

    Central Texas...where I live is the very eastern edge of what is
    known here as the 'Hill Country'. I live in an area also known as
    South Central Texas...Driving south out of Dallas/FW area at first
    you go up hill, then it's down hill from there. D/FW is farther
    east than San Antonio. Houston is farther north and east of SA. San
    Antonio is farther south than NO...

    I've only been to four cities iun Texas (Baytown, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston), but have been through more and no farther west.

    FW is east of here, if you look at it in a parallel sense of direction.

    But, you're never going to be at or near sea level until you get to
    Corpus...

    Or New Orleans. (-:

    NO is -Sea Level. I've driven several cars at 36 feet below sea level.

    Through no fault of mine, I haven't been that far west. Had I
    been single at the time, I would have gone to the California coast
    just to experience the lack of humidity.

    You don't have to go that far. SC Texas has no humidity, unless
    there is an offshore flow from the Gulf. You can be outside in the
    afternoon here and the temps may be 95F, but you won't feel it
    until the humidty reaches over 90% or more. That's pretty rare, as
    usually there is a breeze out of the north blowing off shore.

    There's another reason I didn't mention. I've only seen the Pacific
    Ocean in pictures.

    I'd never seen the Gulf of Mexico except in pictures, until I moved here.
    The Pacific is a beautiful blue while the Gulf is an ugly brown full of
    jelly fish.

    A couple of years from now, if not sooner, I'm going to take a trip
    to Las Vegas and from there go to see the Grand Canyon. My only
    regret will be I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    There aren't any horses at the GC...only mules. Take the old steam engine
    train from Williams instead. It stops at the GC lodge and you can get a
    room and stay for a few days. There's also a helicopter ride over the
    canyon, which is much easier than riding a mule to the bottom.

    But just heading south from north isn't going down hill.

    Yes, it is. Think about the differences in sea level.

    There is no difference here. There isn't any difference until you
    get to the tip of South America, where the Atlantic and Pacific
    meet. Of course this isn't the only place you can experience
    different ocean levels. This is why there are locks in the Panama
    Canal, so that ships can meet the levels of both oceans as they
    head west or east.

    What a tangent! (-: Make that northwest and southeast.

    You might want to look a little closer: The canal itself runs in a
    east/west direction in Panama. However, ships traveling from the Pacific
    to the Atlantic travel in a northwest direction, while ships traveling
    from the Atlantic to the Pacific head Southeast.

    An example is when we visit relatives every other week in north
    Louisiana. The time to get there, since we're traveling south to
    north, is greater than the return home time. Try it yourself.
    I'll bet you notice the difference.

    I've driven from here to Illinois and back. There is no
    difference...

    I find that difficult to believe and since this didn't come up before
    you made the trip, you naturally wouldn't notice since you wouldn't
    have had that on your mind.

    Oh but I would. I always keep track of my mileage and how much fuel I
    use, where we fuel up and where we eat (not necessarily at the same stop).

    I never take such a trip without planning the route first. Indeed, when I didn't like the route traveled to Illinois on one particular trip
    (IH-40 to US54 at Tucumcari, NM northeastward to Wichita, KS (IH35)), I
    sat at my parent's kitchen table and planned a different and faster route
    back to San Diego. US54 was scenic, but a terrible road to use if you're
    in a hurry. My dad recommended it, so I considered the source and didn't
    take it home...

    Did you average the same speed going and coming and not notice the
    difference?

    Same speed, same roads...I've tried several different routes and
    they all work out the same.

    See above.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to Roy Witt on Sun Apr 7 15:44:30 2013
    On Sun Apr-07-2013 11:36, Roy Witt (1:387/22) wrote to Roger Nelson:

    Yes, but if I'm not careful in pressing the gas pedal, I'll be thrown
    into the back seat (not literally).

    Too strong of a return spring on your gas pedal?

    LOL!

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    Yes, exactly.

    What if you're driving west from the white cliffs of Dover?

    More than likely you'll run into a flock of Bluebirds. (-:
    [...]

    I've only been to four cities iun Texas (Baytown, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston), but have been through more and no farther west.

    FW is east of here, if you look at it in a parallel sense of
    direction.

    Yep.

    But, you're never going to be at or near sea level until you get to
    Corpus...

    Or New Orleans. (-:

    NO is -Sea Level. I've driven several cars at 36 feet below sea
    level.

    That's what the smiley was for. Two houses I lived in were destroyed by Katrina because they were close to the lake front where the seawall was breached. Maybe I should have typed NEAR New Orleans. I've always known N.O. was below sea level, having been born there.
    [...]

    There's another reason I didn't mention. I've only seen the Pacific
    Ocean in pictures.

    I'd never seen the Gulf of Mexico except in pictures, until I moved
    here. The Pacific is a beautiful blue while the Gulf is an ugly
    brown full of jelly fish.

    Go a little farther out and it is green until you get to the Gulf Stream, which
    is a beautiful blue. I've been in it.

    A couple of years from now, if not sooner, I'm going to take a trip
    to Las Vegas and from there go to see the Grand Canyon. My only
    regret will be I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    There aren't any horses at the GC...only mules. Take the old steam
    engine train from Williams instead. It stops at the GC lodge and
    you can get a room and stay for a few days. There's also a
    helicopter ride over the canyon, which is much easier than riding a
    mule to the bottom.

    Surely there are stables nearby where a horse can be rented. I thought I saw an ad a few years back when I almost went there -- Apache something-or-other. [...]

    What a tangent! (-: Make that northwest and southeast.

    You might want to look a little closer: The canal itself runs in a east/west direction in Panama. However, ships traveling from the
    Pacific to the Atlantic travel in a northwest direction, while
    ships traveling from the Atlantic to the Pacific head Southeast.

    Isn't that what I wrote? (-:
    [...]

    I find that difficult to believe and since this didn't come up before
    you made the trip, you naturally wouldn't notice since you wouldn't
    have had that on your mind.

    Oh but I would. I always keep track of my mileage and how much fuel
    I use, where we fuel up and where we eat (not necessarily at the
    same stop).

    I never take such a trip without planning the route first. Indeed,
    when I didn't like the route traveled to Illinois on one particular
    trip (IH-40 to US54 at Tucumcari, NM northeastward to Wichita, KS
    (IH35)), I sat at my parent's kitchen table and planned a different
    and faster route back to San Diego. US54 was scenic, but a
    terrible road to use if you're in a hurry. My dad recommended it,
    so I considered the source and didn't take it home...

    I didn't mean to make that assumption, so it's different for us. (-:0
    [...]


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROGER NELSON on Mon Apr 8 06:30:00 2013
    There's another reason I didn't mention. I've only seen the Pacific Ocean i RN>pictures. A couple of years from now, if not sooner, I'm going to take a tr RN>to Las Vegas and from there go to see the Grand Canyon. My only regret will RN>I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    You do NOT want to do that anyhow. The Grand Canyon Ride to the bottom
    of the Canyon and back up is a KILLER for Old Bones. :-)
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Roger Nelson on Tue Apr 9 12:26:54 2013
    Roger Nelson wrote to Roy Witt:

    Because anyone going north to south is going downhill. (-:0

    Not exactly. If your north starting place was on a plateau and you
    were going south, that might be down hill.

    Yes, exactly.

    What if you're driving west from the white cliffs of Dover?

    More than likely you'll run into a flock of Bluebirds. (-:
    [...]

    The same thing occurs when you drive west to the cliffs over looking La
    Jolla, accept they're sea gulls and not bluebirds.

    I'd never seen the Gulf of Mexico except in pictures, until I moved
    here. The Pacific is a beautiful blue while the Gulf is an ugly
    brown full of jelly fish.

    Go a little farther out and it is green until you get to the Gulf
    Stream, which is a beautiful blue. I've been in it.

    I've never wanted to be 'in it', rather on it. After watching a couple of
    guys using a towed diving-board pulled by the boat I was driving ride to
    the bottom of the ocean, just outside of San Diego Bay. When they surfaced
    they had to clear their masks of nose-mucus, I had no desire to be in it.

    A couple of years from now, if not sooner, I'm going to take a
    trip to Las Vegas and from there go to see the Grand Canyon. My
    only regret will be I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    There aren't any horses at the GC...only mules. Take the old steam
    engine train from Williams instead. It stops at the GC lodge and
    you can get a room and stay for a few days. There's also a
    helicopter ride over the canyon, which is much easier than riding a
    mule to the bottom.

    Surely there are stables nearby where a horse can be rented.

    Sure, but they don't ride down the canyon, they ride through the forest to
    the rim and you get to look down in it. You can do that after parking your
    car in the rim lot and walking to the edge.

    I thought I saw an ad a few years back when I almost went there --
    Apache something-or-other. [...]

    There are probably a bunch of them...you can even vist the Navajo Indian Reservation by horseback.

    What a tangent! (-: Make that northwest and southeast.

    You might want to look a little closer: The canal itself runs in a
    east/west direction in Panama. However, ships traveling from the
    Pacific to the Atlantic travel in a northwest direction, while
    ships traveling from the Atlantic to the Pacific head Southeast.

    Isn't that what I wrote? (-:

    Nope. Panama the country is slanted at an angle to a north/south grid,
    thus \ - while the canal is situated purpendicular to the n/s grid, or
    west to east and vice versa.

    I find that difficult to believe and since this didn't come up
    before you made the trip, you naturally wouldn't notice since you
    wouldn't have had that on your mind.

    Oh but I would. I always keep track of my mileage and how much fuel
    I use, where we fuel up and where we eat (not necessarily at the
    same stop).

    I never take such a trip without planning the route first. Indeed,
    when I didn't like the route traveled to Illinois on one particular
    trip (IH-40 to US54 at Tucumcari, NM northeastward to Wichita, KS
    (IH35)), I sat at my parent's kitchen table and planned a different
    and faster route back to San Diego. US54 was scenic, but a
    terrible road to use if you're in a hurry. My dad recommended it,
    so I considered the source and didn't take it home...

    I didn't mean to make that assumption, so it's different for us.
    (-:0 [...]

    But not lately. I've traveled the country from Illinois to Washington to California and back again. I've traveled the country from California to Illinois more often in fourty years than I want to think about.

    These days I just let my GPS plan the route and if I want to go a
    different way than the GPS plans, I just drive that way and let the GPS
    bitch about it. ('turn around when possible') ... Ignoring that, I drive
    on until the GPS modifys the planned route and shows me a new route to my destination.

    BTW, I don't know how many times I've passed the Grand Canyon turn-off,
    but I've only been there once. All I saw was a big hole in the ground and
    no possible way to enjoy myself looking at something I can't get close to.
    (100 ft tall pines that look like small blades of grass from the rim
    vantage point) The train ride from Williams to the canyon rim is $70 for
    each adult and that's coach. Observation fare is $170...if you don't want
    to stay the night, then you can return on the return ride at 3:30pm and
    find cheaper lodging - in Flagstaff.

    Accept for the Park Ranger guided tour, it wasn't worth spending anymore
    of my time there.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to TOM WALKER on Wed Apr 10 06:21:31 2013
    My only regret will I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    You do NOT want to do that anyhow. The Grand Canyon Ride to the bottom
    of the Canyon and back up is a KILLER for Old Bones. :-)

    But, but, Ronald Reagan rode one until he couldn't get his foot in the stirrup.
    (-:

    "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse."
    ---Ronald Reagan


    Regards,

    Roger

    --- D'Bridge 3.91
    * Origin: NCS BBS (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROGER NELSON on Wed Apr 10 07:47:00 2013
    My only regret will I won't be able to ride a horse while there.

    You do NOT want to do that anyhow. The Grand Canyon Ride to the bottom RN>TW> of the Canyon and back up is a KILLER for Old Bones. :-)

    But, but, Ronald Reagan rode one until he couldn't get his foot in the stirr
    (-:

    "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse."
    ---Ronald Reagan

    That may be true but there is a vast difference between riding a horse
    on in open country or even on a trail and down into and out of the Grand Canyon.

    I never did do the the Tourist ride but in my younger years I did hike
    down into the Havasupai Indann reservation and ride a Horse out, The
    owner wanted soem supplies form the trading post up on the canyon rim
    at the head of the trail A frend and I took them up so they could be
    loaded and brought back down with the next pack horse trip.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ 0
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to TOM WALKER on Thu Apr 11 09:06:20 2013
    On Wed Apr-10-2013 07:47, TOM WALKER (1:123/140) wrote to ROGER NELSON:

    "The best thing for the inside of a man is the outside of a horse."
    ---Ronald Reagan

    That may be true but there is a vast difference between riding a
    horse on in open country or even on a trail and down into and out
    of the Grand Canyon.

    That's true and maybe my ol' bones couldn't take it, but I do remember how to sit a horse. It's just like riding a bycicle.

    I never did do the the Tourist ride but in my younger years I did
    hike down into the Havasupai Indann reservation and ride a Horse
    out, The owner wanted soem supplies form the trading post up on the
    canyon rim at the head of the trail A frend and I took them up so
    they could be loaded and brought back down with the next pack horse
    trip.

    If I survive my upcoming knee surgery and go west (that sounds familiar), I just might be able to get on the saddle without help. Only then will I know which one of us is right, although I should point out I'm not disagreeing with you -- I'm just stubborn when it comes to things I've done in the past.


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to ROGER NELSON on Thu Apr 11 08:31:00 2013
    I never did do the the Tourist ride but in my younger years I did
    hike down into the Havasupai Indann reservation and ride a Horse
    out, The owner wanted soem supplies form the trading post up on the canyon rim at the head of the trail A frend and I took them up so
    they could be loaded and brought back down with the next pack horse trip.

    If I survive my upcoming knee surgery and go west (that sounds familiar), I RN>just might be able to get on the saddle without help. Only then will I know RN>which one of us is right, although I should point out I'm not disagreeing wi RN>you -- I'm just stubborn when it comes to things I've done in the past.

    Ask Roy, I have a bit of stubborness myself. :-) :-)
    And I hear you. I tried to wrok on cars wel past the tiem when a
    reasonable man would have given it up.. My last gasp was Oil Changes
    and I finally had to give that up a little less then two years ago.
    I guess I should jsut rembember the good tiems as for over 50 years I
    did almsot all of my repairs except Body work and Automatic
    transmissions. And since for many years because of necessity I picked my vehicles from the Consumer Reports "Worst Used Car Buy" list. I even had
    my own Tow Bar so I could rescue the wife when her car quit. Frotunatly
    I only had to do that four times. On one occasion I changed the timing
    belt in the parking lot where she works. Adn twice I had to rescue me
    secong son. He was a driver that was hard on cars. He had two Mercurt
    Capri v-6's which had a Composition fiber tweeth of the timing grar. He
    shucked it twice and I had to change it. It hapened enough that the
    Mercury Dealer has a special gasket kit for Timing gear replacement.

    In the last several years the Realities of Old Age have really ghit me
    hard. I had to give up working the San Diego County Sheriffs Volunter
    Patrol after a little over 10 years and also My playing "Apprentice
    Machinist and General Maitenance gofer" at the Campo Railroad Museum
    Facility also after a little over 10 years.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom strikes agaoin
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to TOM WALKER on Fri Apr 12 17:07:31 2013
    TOM WALKER wrote to ROGER NELSON:

    I'm just stubborn when it comes to things I've done in the past.

    Ask Roy, I have a bit of stubborness myself. :-) :-)

    Your middle name should be mule...

    And I hear you. I tried to wrok on cars wel past the tiem when a reasonable man would have given it up.

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    How many of those are around today?

    . My last gasp was Oil Changes and I finally had to give that up a
    little less then two years ago.

    I've had a hip joint ailment all year long. When I came out of the house
    the other day, I had a flat tire. Rather than remove it myself, I waited
    for a friend of mine, who's 25 years my junior, to come over. He did the
    hard work, I gathered the needed tools, jack and stands...

    I guess I should jsut rembember the good tiems as for over 50 years
    I did almsot all of my repairs except Body work and Automatic transmissions. And since for many years because of necessity I picked
    my vehicles from the Consumer Reports "Worst Used Car Buy" list. I
    even had my own Tow Bar so I could rescue the wife when her car quit.

    8^) I have a 18' car trailer for that kind of work. I don't tell a lot of people about it these days because when I had one in San Diego, everybody
    and his brother would call me at all times of the day and night, needing
    the use of my trailer. I finally bought another because Uhaul won't rent a trailer to anyone who intends to pull it with a short-bed pickup.

    Frotunatly I only had to do that four times. On one occasion I
    changed the timing belt in the parking lot where she works. Adn twice
    I had to rescue me secong son. He was a driver that was hard on cars.
    He had two Mercurt Capri v-6's which had a Composition fiber tweeth
    of the timing grar.

    That's old school. Many Ford flatheads had one of those and the first time
    it went out, it was replaced with an aluminum timing gear. Unless your
    mechanic wasn't your friend, he put a composition gear back in.

    He shucked it twice and I had to change it. It hapened enough that
    the Mercury Dealer has a special gasket kit for Timing gear
    replacement.

    9^)

    In the last several years the Realities of Old Age have really ghit
    me hard. I had to give up working the San Diego County Sheriffs
    Volunter Patrol after a little over 10 years

    8^(

    and also My playing "Apprentice Machinist and General Maitenance
    gofer" at the Campo Railroad Museum Facility also after a little over
    10 years.

    Since I moved my CNC mill to my garage and got it up and running again,
    bought a small 7" swing lathe and a 10" band saw, I've re-designed the
    floating bowties on my 18" Q56 wheels and made them better than the 'prototypes' that were in service for over two years. Last week I started
    a project to install a rifle scope to my Red Ryder BB gun. I made some
    bases and mounted them to the BB gun and now I'm in the process of making
    caps to hold the scope in place. My next door neighbor is into the gas
    powered remote control cars and he's already got some projects for me,
    just in case I run out of things to do. 8^)

    The thing is, I'm not inclined to work on anything in the garage for any
    amount of time before I get tired (legs and hip) and have to take a rest. Sometimes I can last for hours, other times, just a few minutes at a time.

    10mg of Hydrocodone Bitartrate and 200mg of Ibuprofen fixes that; but then
    it's time to take a nap...and to think, just 8 years ago I was crawling in
    and out of my 56, swapping old brakes for new rotors, replacing the trans
    with an OD and not feeling a bit like an old man.


    R\%/itt


    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    * Origin: Texas Lone-Star - Texan, American, USAian (1:387/22)
  • From Roger Nelson@1:3828/7 to TOM WALKER on Sun Apr 14 09:41:16 2013
    On Thu Apr-11-2013 08:31, TOM WALKER (1:123/140) wrote to ROGER NELSON:

    I never did do the the Tourist ride but in my younger years I did
    hike down into the Havasupai Indann reservation and ride a Horse
    out, The owner wanted soem supplies form the trading post up on the canyon rim at the head of the trail A frend and I took them up so
    they could be loaded and brought back down with the next pack horse trip.

    If I survive my upcoming knee surgery and go west (that sounds
    familiar), I just might be able to get on the saddle without help.
    Only then will I know which one of us is right, although I should
    point out I'm not disagreeing with you -- I'm just stubborn when it RN>comes to things I've done in the past.

    Ask Roy, I have a bit of stubborness myself. :-) :-)

    I have limited myself to changing spark pluge that I can reach because the torque required for them is well within my capability (so far). Gone are the days when I'd try that on a V-8 Chevy because on the rear ones, 5, 7, 6, and 8 requires getting under the car to do that.

    And I hear you. I tried to wrok on cars wel past the tiem when a reasonable man would have given it up.. My last gasp was Oil
    Changes and I finally had to give that up a little less then two
    years ago. I guess I should jsut rembember the good tiems as for
    over 50 years I did almsot all of my repairs except Body work and Automatic transmissions. And since for many years because of
    necessity I picked my vehicles from the Consumer Reports "Worst
    Used Car Buy" list. I even had my own Tow Bar so I could rescue
    the wife when her car quit. Frotunatly I only had to do that four
    times. On one occasion I changed the timing belt in the parking
    lot where she works. Adn twice I had to rescue me secong son. He
    was a driver that was hard on cars. He had two Mercurt Capri v-6's
    which had a Composition fiber tweeth of the timing grar. He
    shucked it twice and I had to change it. It hapened enough that
    the Mercury Dealer has a special gasket kit for Timing gear
    replacement.

    In the last several years the Realities of Old Age have really ghit
    me hard. I had to give up working the San Diego County Sheriffs
    Volunter Patrol after a little over 10 years and also My playing "Apprentice Machinist and General Maitenance gofer" at the Campo
    Railroad Museum Facility also after a little over 10 years.

    "Good soldiers NEVER volunteer for anything." (-:


    Regards,

    Roger
    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: NCS BBS - Houma, LoUiSiAna - (1:3828/7)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roger Nelson on Thu Apr 11 14:29:28 2013
    That's true and maybe my ol' bones couldn't take it, but I do remember
    how
    to sit a horse. It's just like riding a bycicle.

    I rode 67.44 horses this morning to work. :)

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Tom Walker on Sun Mar 17 15:03:48 2013
    One has to pay careful attention to the instructions as it is very easy
    to Overcharge the system. And it causes problems, some of which can
    damage the compressor.

    Yes, overcharging can damage the compressor and also make the system not blow cold air.

    Most of the re-charge kits available come with a gauge on them. I would highly
    recommend using one of the hoses with the gauge so you are not blindly adding coolant.

    I have two of those hoses that I put on the cans when needed. I used to carry one around with me in the Monte Carlo when I had the leak. Now that it is fixed, that isn't really necessary.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roger Nelson on Thu Mar 21 12:42:26 2013
    I liked the front seat of my '57 Bel Air. Way more room.


    How about a 1977 Chrysler New Yorker! :)

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From TOM WALKER@1:123/140 to MARK HOFMANN on Mon May 6 07:11:00 2013
    One has to pay careful attention to the instructions as it is very easy MH>TW> to Overcharge the system. And it causes problems, some of which can MH>TW> damage the compressor.

    Yes, overcharging can damage the compressor and also make the system not blo MH>cold air.

    Most of the re-charge kits available come with a gauge on them. I would hig MH>recommend using one of the hoses with the gauge so you are not blindly addin MH>coolant.

    In the old days most systems had a sight glass on them. If you saw
    bubbles when it was operating the system charge was too low.
    You added F-12 until the bubbles disappeared.
    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ Typo Tom Strkes Again
    * Origin: Fidonet Since 1991 Join Us: www.DocsPlace.org (1:123/140)
  • From Jim Haight@1:322/757 to Mark Hofmann on Mon May 27 21:09:19 2013
    Must be a Harley Mark!

    Re: Re: Ow!

    That's true and maybe my ol' bones couldn't take it, but I do remember how
    to sit a horse. It's just like riding a bycicle.

    I rode 67.44 horses this morning to work. :)

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)

    Origin: Mysteria Majicka BBS; telnet://majicka.at2k.org; Virtual Advanced BBS VirtualNet 1@141000; FidoNet 1:322/757 Cape Cod Massachusetts 10 nodes

    --- Virtual Advanced Ver 2 for DOS
    * Origin: Mysteria Majicka BBS (1:322/757)