• My neighbor

    From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Y'all on Wed May 21 14:12:47 2014
    Greetings Y'all!

    My next door neighbor has just come home with his 4th Chevy 2500 Duramax
    pickup in 2 years. His employer pays him to use his truck to haul
    employees and diesel fuel for equipment around a job site in Louisiana.

    The amount he's paid for this service more than pays for a new truck. Not
    to mention that he's also paid a substantial salary to 'just be there'
    when he's needed...

    Not that he wears them out as much as they're crashed or ruined by
    someone who apparently doesn't know much about them. He totaled a 2008
    3500 Duramax last year because it was fitted with a Bully Dog tuner that
    gave the Duramax more performance than he could handle, thus crashing it
    into an 18 wheeler on the side of the road while passing yet another 18
    wheeler who was going slower than my neighbor wanted to go.

    He no sooner got a replacement and he crashed that one too. Although there
    were extra parts laying next to his house at the time, he opted to buy
    yet another one.

    The new one was a 2009 Duramax 2500 that had been modified to remove the 'urine' injector, which didn't make it run any better. And whoever
    modified that truck, screwed up the wiring harness that the only thing to
    save it was to replace the harness. The engine died on this one because it
    was comprimised by the modifications and it had to be replaced at the tune
    of $10k and it still didn't run like it should with him constantly having
    to work on it to get it to run in limp mode.

    So, he traded it for this 2006 Duramax 2500, which even has a better paint
    job thant the 2009. I thought maybe he wouldn't have to work on it, but,
    nope. His first order of business was to get under the hood and begin
    working on it.

    I expect to see another new one when he comes home from Louisiana, next
    time.


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: Anything of Automotive Interest Discussed Here! (1:387/22)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Thu May 22 15:42:28 2014
    So, he traded it for this 2006 Duramax 2500, which even has a better
    paint job thant the 2009. I thought maybe he wouldn't have to work on it, but, nope. His first order of business was to get under the hood and
    begin working on it.

    I don't mind doing occasional repairs, but constant ones start to wear on you. Also, trying to stay ahead of repairs/issues and not let them get to the point where you have too many things wrong. Those are the ones that people end up throwing in the towel.

    In doing my own weekend repairs, one of my other things that I try and do is buy the best part I can. Nothing more irritating than having done a repair, only to have the replaced part fail and have to perform the same repair again.

    I had that issue with wheel bearings on my Monte Carlo. I must have replaced 3
    or 4 of them before finally getting a decent brand that isn't made in China (Timkin). Had great luck with them so far, which put an end to my revolving repairs on the wheel bearings.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Sat May 24 10:54:32 2014
    Greetings Mark!



    So, he traded it for this 2006 Duramax 2500, which even has a better
    paint job thant the 2009. I thought maybe he wouldn't have to work
    on it, but, nope. His first order of business was to get under the
    hood and begin working on it.

    I don't mind doing occasional repairs, but constant ones start to
    wear on you. Also, trying to stay ahead of repairs/issues and not let
    them get to the point where you have too many things wrong. Those
    are the ones that people end up throwing in the towel.

    Well, my friend Harry, who is the service manager at a Chevy dealer about
    60 miles south of here tells me that there wasn't anything wrong with any
    of those trucks that a competent mechanic couldn't fix. His dealership was
    the dealer that R&Red that engine for my neighbor. Apparently the harmonic balancer came loose and my neighbor was the one who had butchered the
    crank to include a bolt to keep it in place. All Chevy engines have press
    fit balancers. What he did was drive it too long without the balancer and destroyed the engine in the process.

    In doing my own weekend repairs, one of my other things that I try
    and do is buy the best part I can. Nothing more irritating than
    having done a repair, only to have the replaced part fail and have to perform the same repair again.

    I hear you there. But, when you're on a budget, it helps to have cheap
    parts available. Best to replace them at your first opportunity though.

    I had that issue with wheel bearings on my Monte Carlo. I must have replaced 3 or 4 of them before finally getting a decent brand that
    isn't made in China (Timkin). Had great luck with them so far, which
    put an end to my revolving repairs on the wheel bearings.

    I don't know if you're aware, but Chevy started to use sealed spindle
    bearings around 2000 and you don't replace them with a new set of
    bearings, you replace the entire spindle. It's a bolt on procedure that
    only requires disassembly and re-assembly. Best part is the brake rotors
    are made seperate from the spindle assembly and they can be worked on
    without disturbing the spindle. OTH, every Chevy mechanic's nightmare are
    the rear rotors with a parking brake-drum inside of them. My 12yo pickup
    just turned over 80k and I'm thinking about doing a front brake job, but
    am reluctant to tear into it and have to do spindles in another 40k...

    Still, the brakes will have to be done before those spindle bearings reach
    the end of their life.


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: Anything of Automotive Interest Discussed Here! (1:387/22)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Mon May 26 11:22:05 2014
    I don't know if you're aware, but Chevy started to use sealed spindle bearings around 2000 and you don't replace them with a new set of
    bearings, you replace the entire spindle. It's a bolt on procedure that

    Yes, the wheel bearings on both my Monte Carlo and Durango are all one sealed unit. The main difference being that the Monte Carlo front and rear bearings have speed sensors in them for the ABS system. Often, they are the reason why you end up having to replace the entire bearing. It will cause the ABS light to come on if they are faulty. I have a ABS scanner that can tell me while speed sensor is bad. Otherwise, it is a guessing game.

    My most recent repair was replacing the tires on the Harley. A friend of mine brought over his bike jack and showed me how to remove the wheels - which included having to remove the muffler.

    I got had ordered new tires, got them mounted and balanced at the local Harley shop and then last week, but the new ones back on the bike. Not a super easy task, espcially when working alone on the rear tire.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Fri May 30 09:20:43 2014
    Greetings Mark!



    I don't know if you're aware, but Chevy started to use sealed
    spindle bearings around 2000 and you don't replace them with a new
    set of bearings, you replace the entire spindle. It's a bolt on
    procedure that

    Yes, the wheel bearings on both my Monte Carlo and Durango are all
    one sealed unit. The main difference being that the Monte Carlo
    front and rear bearings have speed sensors in them for the ABS
    system.

    As does my Silverado.

    Often, they are the reason why you end up having to replace
    the entire bearing. It will cause the ABS light to come on if they
    are faulty. I have a ABS scanner that can tell me while speed sensor
    is bad. Otherwise, it is a guessing game.

    That's odd. The Silverado has removable speed sensors. Of course, you have
    to remove the rotors and caliper to get to them.

    My most recent repair was replacing the tires on the Harley. A
    friend of mine brought over his bike jack and showed me how to remove
    the wheels - which included having to remove the muffler.

    That's always a joy to do. Mine would require the same removal.

    I got had ordered new tires, got them mounted and balanced at the
    local Harley shop and then last week, but the new ones back on the
    bike. Not a super easy task, espcially when working alone on the
    rear tire.

    I'd have the bike shop do all of the work. I'll just ride it, thank you
    very much.


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: Anything of Automotive Interest Discussed Here! (1:387/22)
  • From Mark Hofmann@1:261/1304 to Roy Witt on Sat May 31 17:25:14 2014
    I'd have the bike shop do all of the work. I'll just ride it, thank you very much.

    The previous tire change, I took it to the shop where I bought it. This time a
    friend of mine offered to help show me how to do the job myself. He also let me borrow his bike jack.

    Now that I know how it all works, it isn't too bad. Not a super easy task when
    dealing with the rear wheel by yourself. Much easier with two people.

    - Mark

    --- WWIVToss v.1.50
    * Origin: http://www.weather-station.org * Bel Air, MD -USA (1:261/1304.0)
  • From Roy Witt@1:387/22 to Mark Hofmann on Tue Jun 3 10:25:43 2014
    Greetings Mark!



    I'd have the bike shop do all of the work. I'll just ride it, thank
    you very much.

    The previous tire change, I took it to the shop where I bought it.
    This time a friend of mine offered to help show me how to do the job myself. He also let me borrow his bike jack.

    Now that I know how it all works, it isn't too bad. Not a super easy
    task when dealing with the rear wheel by yourself. Much easier with
    two people.

    The bike shop has a motorcycle lift that helps one technician do that job.

    Last month I had occasion to visit the local Aprilla bike shop in town.
    They even have a dyno to test builds for optimum power (they race
    Apprillas). Can you imagine how that would work out if you were testing a
    MC and the restraining straps snapped in two. 8^(


    Have a day!

    R\%/itt - K5RXT

    --- GoldED+/W32 1.1.5-31012
    --- D'Bridge 3.99
    * Origin: Anything of Automotive Interest Discussed Here! (1:387/22)