• tracking time in a batch, my approach

    From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to all on Wed Aug 31 02:10:38 2011
    Hi folks,

    A conversation in another echo re timing and 4dos and its
    variants triggered the thought I should maybe post this in
    case it's of use to somebody.


    A few months ago when I was doing a bunch of updating and
    upgrading to my dos based network control tracking stuff I
    decided it might be nice if the program reminded me of
    certain things that should be done periodically, say at
    quarter past, the half hour, three quarters past and again
    when getting time to hand off at the end of my watch.

    So, using horst's little logecho which expresses token uses
    in its command lines, (used much as echo would be used for
    the uninitiated) I could then build a batch within the batch which stuffed minutes after the hour into an environment
    variable called counter.

    then it's easy to trap that variable, branch accordingly.

    An example from my programming ...
    set counter=
    echo @echo off >> counter.bat
    :: next line using horst's logecho sets it up.
    logecho set counter=$m >> counter.bat
    call counter.bat
    del counter.bat
    cls
    if %COUNTER%==02 goto begin
    if %COUNTER%==03 goto begin
    if %COUNTER%==04 goto begin
    if %COUNTER%==05 goto fiver
    if %COUNTER%==07 goto sevens
    if %COUNTER%==10 goto tenner
    if %COUNTER%==15 goto quarter
    if %COUNTER%==20 goto fiver
    if %COUNTER%==21 goto sevens
    if %COUNTER%==25 goto fiver
    if %COUNTER%==28 goto 28
    if %COUNTER%==30 goto bottom
    if %COUNTER%==35 goto fiver
    ...

    So now say at the label fiver I can make the program display the pending traffic list on the screen for one minute,
    whilst using horst's wait.com to trap the errorlevel
    according to the keystroke, so I have the menu available,
    even though menu doesn't show on the screen, but the list of outstanding business does.
    I hope this is helpful to somebody out there.


    Regards,
    Richard
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    * Origin: (1:116/901)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/384 to Richard Webb on Thu Sep 1 09:44:00 2011
    Hi! Richard,

    In a message to All you wrote:

    I hope this is helpful to somebody out there.

    Nice one!, Richard.

    I don't have a use for it the moment but it will have a cozy warm spot in my messagebase for quite some time to come. (Purging is based on an upper limit of 2000; top message is currently 738; and, #1 is dated 15 Oct 2003).

    =:)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

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    * Origin: District 9: SAVE the PRAWNS !! (3:640/384)
  • From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to Paul Quinn on Thu Sep 1 03:37:23 2011
    HI Paul,

    On Thu 2011-Sep-01 09:44, Paul Quinn (3:640/384) wrote to Richard Webb:


    I hope this is helpful to somebody out there.

    Nice one!, Richard.

    Thought you'd appreciate that. I was sitting around one
    evening lamenting the ability to do such things with a batch and suddenly the lightbulb came on in my head.

    I don't have a use for it the moment but it will have a cozy warm
    spot in my messagebase for quite some time to come. (Purging is
    based on an upper limit of 2000; top message is currently 738; and,
    #1 is dated 15 Oct 2003).

    <wow> I used to have a good archive of the batpower echo
    that Katrina took away from me, I've seen other best of
    batpower type collections out there, got a couple of 'em
    here, but before I knew somebody was working on such a
    project had sorta started my own, funny but some of the
    early ones they thought were worthy of a "best of" I did too <g>.

    Regards,
    Richard
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    * Origin: (1:116/901)
  • From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to Paul Quinn on Sat Sep 3 02:21:52 2011
    HI again Paul,

    On Thu 2011-Sep-01 09:44, Paul Quinn (3:640/384) wrote to Richard Webb:

    I hope this is helpful to somebody out there.

    Nice one!, Richard.

    I'm becoming rather proud of my public service radio net
    control logger written in batch. Getting it down to just
    about what I really think I want, and need.

    I've got some interesting wrinkles here. I don't want all
    the menus, but my lady does when she does net control work.
    I want the advantages of the single keystroke to get to the
    function I want which menus provide, but with less verbosity which is why I started on this thing years ago.
    A colleague of mine wrote a nice net control logger with
    associated database program for regulars, his own
    proprietary format, almost like a dbase or other .dbf file
    with indexes and the like. ONly trouble is, for a speech
    screen reader user all the tab here tab there means you're
    spending too much time figuring out where you are and
    listening to the screen talk, and not enough time listening
    to the radio. Before Katrina took it I'd pulled some of his data files out to flat text though, and use email call sign
    look up capability to get newer ones than I have.

    After we get done looking at what time it is then we go to
    :regular in the batch.
    But first we look at a file called netmenu.sem which has
    maionly lines containing a * character each time the main
    batch executes, or one of the other processes causes that to happen.
    We use dos find to count ther number of lines with the *
    then compare that with ifnumber to a value set as checknum,
    which is set to 5. IF equal or greater then we delete
    netmenu.sem for it to be rebuilt anew.
    Then we branch, if my lady's in the hot seat then the
    program shows her a bit of information to read on air or
    reminds her of important things to take care of. If I'm in
    the chair it gives me a little one liner reminding me to
    talk about this or that item, then rotates around again.

    As I said, I'm rather proud of it, gives us each the
    individual operating environment we need, gives me quick
    access to session data, and helps keep me on task.



    Regards,
    Richard
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    * Origin: (1:116/901)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/384 to Richard Webb on Sun Sep 4 17:11:00 2011
    Hi! Richard,

    On Sat, 03 Sep 11, you wrote to me:

    As I said, I'm rather proud of it, gives us each the
    individual operating environment we need, gives me quick
    access to session data, and helps keep me on task.

    Oh great, now you have me thinking of doing some canned voices in WAVE format playing on my one and only DOS batch menu that I still use, instead of visually
    scanning the options. I've recently been playing with a text to speech program
    in Win XP, using the MS 'Sam' voice, and have had some great fun with answering
    machine messages. :)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

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    * Origin: Of COURSE I'm on topic. (Which echo is this?) (3:640/384)
  • From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to Paul Quinn on Sun Sep 4 14:20:50 2011
    Hi Paul,

    On Sun 2011-Sep-04 17:11, Paul Quinn (3:640/384) wrote to Richard Webb:

    As I said, I'm rather proud of it, gives us each the
    individual operating environment we need, gives me quick
    access to session data, and helps keep me on task.

    Oh great, now you have me thinking of doing some canned voices in
    WAVE format playing on my one and only DOS batch menu that I still
    use, instead of visually scanning the options. I've recently been
    playing with a text to speech program in Win XP, using the MS 'Sam'
    voice, and have had some great fun with answering machine messages.
    :)

    IT could sure work in the right applications. At one time,
    separate speech and sound cards of course, I had a little
    command line .wav or .voc player. I also had for studio use the complete Warner Brothers sound effects library and a
    couple of other sfx libraries. I'd use it to play small
    .wav files in the middle of some batches, i.e. when doing
    scandisk and defrag as soon as the batch went through nuking temporary files, *.bak files and the like just before we
    started the scandisk defrag process you'd hear a .wav of a
    toilet flush, etc. Was a cute little gimmick, but could
    have been useful for a few things.

    Regards,
    Richard
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    * Origin: (1:116/901)
  • From BOB KLAHN@1:123/140 to RICHARD WEBB on Mon Sep 5 00:35:40 2011
    ...

    use the complete Warner Brothers sound effects library and a
    couple of other sfx libraries. I'd use it to play small
    .wav files in the middle of some batches, i.e. when doing
    ...
    .wav of a toilet flush, etc. Was a cute little gimmick,
    but could have been useful for a few things.

    We had some of those on computers at work. Cute once. Damned
    annoying the 356th time. I wiped them.



    BOB KLAHN bob.klahn@sev.org http://home.toltbbs.com/bobklahn

    ... Take time to smell the roses and eventually you'll inhale a bee.
    --- Via Silver Xpress V4.5/P [Reg]
    * Origin: Since 1991 And Were Still Here! DOCSPLACE.TZO.COM (1:123/140)
  • From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to BOB KLAHN on Mon Sep 5 13:17:40 2011
    Hi Bob,

    use the complete Warner Brothers sound effects library and a
    couple of other sfx libraries. I'd use it to play small
    .wav files in the middle of some batches, i.e. when doing
    ...
    .wav of a toilet flush, etc. Was a cute little gimmick,
    but could have been useful for a few things.

    We had some of those on computers at work. Cute once. Damned
    annoying the 356th time. I wiped them.

    YEah some of that could be, but there were things i left for awhile because they let me know that a process was finished, etc.


    Regards,
    Richard
    ---
    * Origin: (1:116/901)
  • From Paul Quinn@3:640/384 to Richard Webb on Tue Sep 6 10:42:00 2011
    Hi! Richard,

    In a message to Bob Klahn you wrote:

    We had some of those on computers at work. Cute once. Damned
    annoying the 356th time. I wiped them.

    YEah some of that could be, but there were things i left for awhile because they let me know that a process was finished, etc.

    Same here, with Windows sound events enabled in this Win98 VirtualBox. I'm still using the same .wav files I had in the old WFWG 3.11 back in 1994.

    With the events enabled I can tell when my Fido mailer starts the 'tosser' BATch after a poll, or a scheduled external BATch starts up or quits, even from
    two rooms away. Even outbound mail scans set off a flurry of canned sounds.

    Great fun, still. :)

    Cheers,
    Paul.

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    * Origin: *Real* programmers use COPY CON MYAPP.ZIP (3:640/384)
  • From Richard Webb@1:116/901 to Paul Quinn on Tue Sep 6 22:50:36 2011
    Hi Paul,

    On Tue 2011-Sep-06 10:42, Paul Quinn (3:640/384) wrote to Richard Webb:

    We had some of those on computers at work. Cute once. Damned
    annoying the 356th time. I wiped them.

    YEah some of that could be, but there were things i left for awhile because they let me know that a process was finished, etc.

    Same here, with Windows sound events enabled in this Win98
    VirtualBox. I'm still using the same .wav files I had in the old
    WFWG 3.11 back in 1994.

    YEah did that on a dos box that had the bbs in it which had
    both sound card and speech card for awhile. Especially
    during daytime events when I might be working on the other
    machine.

    With the events enabled I can tell when my Fido mailer starts the
    'tosser' BATch after a poll, or a scheduled external BATch starts up
    or quits, even from two rooms away. Even outbound mail scans set
    off a flurry of canned sounds.

    YEp, that's a lot of what I did, event exits with binkley
    used the command line audio player. USed it to cue sound
    effects during productions at the studio too, get this, with HOrst's waittime on a couple of occasions.

    This one has no sound card though, and I don't have that
    command line .wav and .voc player anymore.

    Regards,
    Richard
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    * Origin: (1:116/901)