• Ten Good Sqr Dance Rules

    From DARYL STOUT@CAPCITY to ALL USERS on Fri Oct 8 00:01:00 2010
    The following is from "Club Leadership Journal, Oct. 1994; and National Squares, Nov. 1994...with a few personal comments added. DS

    1. BE A GOOD LISTENER. Think of the caller as the quarterback in this
    game of square dancing. He calls the plays by giving you the signals
    for the movements he wants you to make. Two beats later, you do what
    he or she called. You can't be talking or thinking of something else
    and count on reacting correctly. Not only is talking during the
    course of a square dance distracting to you, but also it makes it
    difficult for others in the square to "catch" the instructions, and
    to hear the music. Remember, too, that there is room for only one
    teacher at a time. You can help others best by being in the correct
    place at the correct time.

    2. GET INTO THE SQUARE QUICKLY. When the caller announces "it's square
    dance time", join the square nearest to you that needs dancers to
    fill the square. If you're looking for a square, let the caller
    know where you are by raising your hand as you move across the
    floor. If you need dancers to fill out a square, raise a hand, so
    the caller can notice your need.

    3. BE A COURTEOUS DANCER. Good standard rules of courtesy are always
    appreciated. Asking a partner for a dance, and then saying "thank
    you" to all those in the set with you is a natural reaction. In
    square dancing there are a few specials to look out for. It's
    considered bad manners to pass a square needing dancers in order to
    fill another. And even more important, beware of the unpardonable
    sin...NEVER leave a square once you have joined it -- until the tip
    is over. If you must leave in an emergency situation, such as illness,
    try to fill your spot with a substitute. This is the ONLY reason that
    you should leave the square...even if you consider the dancers in
    your square "not worthy to dance with you". Everyone at one time was
    a beginner.

    4. BE ON TIME FOR CLUB AND NEW DANCER DANCES. Tardiness may be stylish in
    some activities, but in square dancing, one late dancer may mean that
    seven other dancers must sit out a tip. In planning an evening's dance
    program, the caller leans heavily on the first and last tips to pace
    his or her dance. If you are late, or if you leave early, you are not
    taking full advantage of the evening the caller has prepared.

    5. BE A THOUGHTFUL DANCER. Personal hygiene and cleanliness is important
    in any activity where folks exercise vigorously in close contact with
    each other. For that reason, bathing or showering and using a good
    deodorant before a dance; plus brushing your teeth, and using an
    effective mouthwash before a dance are among the best things a square
    dancer can do. Because the enjoyment of the folks in each square
    depends upon you and your coordination, be at your absolute dancing
    best by NOT consuming alcoholic beverages before or during a square
    dance. No one likes to dance in a square with another dancer who has
    body odor, alcoholic beverages or something else on their breath...it
    can be very nauseating, as well as distracting. Some clubs have the
    authority to order violaters to leave the premises. This is a holsum,
    family activity...and it's the duty of all dancers to see that it
    remains that way.

    6. BE A COOPERATIVE DANCER. It might be said that square dancing is an
    activity where everyone is responsible for everyone else's happiness.
    A square is not made up of eight individuals working independently
    but rather it is one unit, with no individual person attempting to
    show off or be "the star. The pleasure comes when each person does
    his or her share in making the square run smoothly. Also, if your
    square does break down, don't criticize another dancer...whether or
    not they were at fault. Form lines of four, and the caller will get
    you back into dancing as soon as possible. No matter how long you've
    been dancing, both dancers and on occasion, callers, will make a
    mistake...just grin and go on.

    7. TAKE IT EASY -- DON'T OVERDO IT. Square dancing can be strenous
    excercise, especially when you're getting started. If you get tired,
    sit out a tip, or more if needed. Don't let anyone talk you into
    dancing if you're tired, feeling light headed, etc. Sometimes, you
    can learn a great deal just by watching and listening. Pace yourself;
    as your dancing time grows, you'll be able to dance for longer periods
    of time...this is not a marathon event where you have to dance every
    single tip that is called. Just because the dancing at big festivals
    can go from 9am to 11pm, no one has the physical strength to dance for
    that long a time without a break for eating, the restroom, etc. I've
    seen folks that overdid it end up being rushed to a hospital.

    8. BE A FRIENDLY DANCER. "Friendship is square dancing's greatest reward".
    You are the host in square dancing. As a matter of fact, everyone is.
    Take the opportunity to get acquainted with others in the square, and
    make it a point to dance with as many different dancers as possible,
    each evening. It has been widely said that "Square Dancing is Friend-
    ship set to Music".

    9. YOU'RE NEVER THROUGH LEARNING. You'll find that there is always
    something new that you can learn, or some part of your dancing which
    you can improve upon. Mistakes are not an abnormal part of dancing.
    Don't hesitate to ask your caller questions if there is something you
    don't understand, or you are having difficulty with during the dance.
    You may be the only one to ask, but chances are a number of others,
    too shy to raise their hands, will be grateful to you for bringing up
    the subject. If you think you've "reached the limit" and learned all
    you need to know...whether you're a dancer or a caller...then you need
    to think again. Those who feel they've reached the limit need to get
    out of the hobby...they're not doing themselves or anyone else a favor.

    10. ENJOY YOURSELF -- HAVE FUN!! Pleasure and enthusiasm are contagious.
    You will be surprised how much your smile will pep up the entire
    square. Expect a good time, and you will experience a good time. Happy
    dancing, and enjoy "friendship set to music".


    .ORIGIN: 035/005 - THE THUNDERBOLT BBS, LITTLE ROCK, AR
    ---
    ■ BgNet 1.0ß12 ≈ Capitol City Online * KY/US * 502/875-8938 * cco.ath.cx
  • From DARYL STOUT@CAPCITY to ALL USERS on Fri Jun 8 00:01:00 2012
    The following is from "Club Leadership Journal, Oct. 1994; and National Squares, Nov. 1994...with a few personal comments added. DS

    1. BE A GOOD LISTENER. Think of the caller as the quarterback in this
    game of square dancing. He calls the plays by giving you the signals
    for the movements he wants you to make. Two beats later, you do what
    he or she called. You can't be talking or thinking of something else
    and count on reacting correctly. Not only is talking during the
    course of a square dance distracting to you, but also it makes it
    difficult for others in the square to "catch" the instructions, and
    to hear the music. Remember, too, that there is room for only one
    teacher at a time. You can help others best by being in the correct
    place at the correct time.

    2. GET INTO THE SQUARE QUICKLY. When the caller announces "it's square
    dance time", join the square nearest to you that needs dancers to
    fill the square. If you're looking for a square, let the caller
    know where you are by raising your hand as you move across the
    floor. If you need dancers to fill out a square, raise a hand, so
    the caller can notice your need.

    3. BE A COURTEOUS DANCER. Good standard rules of courtesy are always
    appreciated. Asking a partner for a dance, and then saying "thank
    you" to all those in the set with you is a natural reaction. In
    square dancing there are a few specials to look out for. It's
    considered bad manners to pass a square needing dancers in order to
    fill another. And even more important, beware of the unpardonable
    sin...NEVER leave a square once you have joined it -- until the tip
    is over. If you must leave in an emergency situation, such as illness,
    try to fill your spot with a substitute. This is the ONLY reason that
    you should leave the square...even if you consider the dancers in
    your square "not worthy to dance with you". Everyone at one time was
    a beginner.

    4. BE ON TIME FOR CLUB AND NEW DANCER DANCES. Tardiness may be stylish in
    some activities, but in square dancing, one late dancer may mean that
    seven other dancers must sit out a tip. In planning an evening's dance
    program, the caller leans heavily on the first and last tips to pace
    his or her dance. If you are late, or if you leave early, you are not
    taking full advantage of the evening the caller has prepared.

    5. BE A THOUGHTFUL DANCER. Personal hygiene and cleanliness is important
    in any activity where folks exercise vigorously in close contact with
    each other. For that reason, bathing or showering and using a good
    deodorant before a dance; plus brushing your teeth, and using an
    effective mouthwash before a dance are among the best things a square
    dancer can do. Because the enjoyment of the folks in each square
    depends upon you and your coordination, be at your absolute dancing
    best by NOT consuming alcoholic beverages before or during a square
    dance. No one likes to dance in a square with another dancer who has
    body odor, alcoholic beverages or something else on their breath...it
    can be very nauseating, as well as distracting. Some clubs have the
    authority to order violaters to leave the premises. This is a holsum,
    family activity...and it's the duty of all dancers to see that it
    remains that way.

    6. BE A COOPERATIVE DANCER. It might be said that square dancing is an
    activity where everyone is responsible for everyone else's happiness.
    A square is not made up of eight individuals working independently
    but rather it is one unit, with no individual person attempting to
    show off or be "the star. The pleasure comes when each person does
    his or her share in making the square run smoothly. Also, if your
    square does break down, don't criticize another dancer...whether or
    not they were at fault. Form lines of four, and the caller will get
    you back into dancing as soon as possible. No matter how long you've
    been dancing, both dancers and on occasion, callers, will make a
    mistake...just grin and go on.

    7. TAKE IT EASY -- DON'T OVERDO IT. Square dancing can be strenous
    excercise, especially when you're getting started. If you get tired,
    sit out a tip, or more if needed. Don't let anyone talk you into
    dancing if you're tired, feeling light headed, etc. Sometimes, you
    can learn a great deal just by watching and listening. Pace yourself;
    as your dancing time grows, you'll be able to dance for longer periods
    of time...this is not a marathon event where you have to dance every
    single tip that is called. Just because the dancing at big festivals
    can go from 9am to 11pm, no one has the physical strength to dance for
    that long a time without a break for eating, the restroom, etc. I've
    seen folks that overdid it end up being rushed to a hospital.

    8. BE A FRIENDLY DANCER. "Friendship is square dancing's greatest reward".
    You are the host in square dancing. As a matter of fact, everyone is.
    Take the opportunity to get acquainted with others in the square, and
    make it a point to dance with as many different dancers as possible,
    each evening. It has been widely said that "Square Dancing is Friend-
    ship set to Music".

    9. YOU'RE NEVER THROUGH LEARNING. You'll find that there is always
    something new that you can learn, or some part of your dancing which
    you can improve upon. Mistakes are not an abnormal part of dancing.
    Don't hesitate to ask your caller questions if there is something you
    don't understand, or you are having difficulty with during the dance.
    You may be the only one to ask, but chances are a number of others,
    too shy to raise their hands, will be grateful to you for bringing up
    the subject. If you think you've "reached the limit" and learned all
    you need to know...whether you're a dancer or a caller...then you need
    to think again. Those who feel they've reached the limit need to get
    out of the hobby...they're not doing themselves or anyone else a favor.

    10. ENJOY YOURSELF -- HAVE FUN!! Pleasure and enthusiasm are contagious.
    You will be surprised how much your smile will pep up the entire
    square. Expect a good time, and you will experience a good time. Happy
    dancing, and enjoy "friendship set to music".


    .ORIGIN: 035/005 - The Thunderbolt BBS -- wx1der.dyndns.org
    ---
    ■ BgNet 1.0ß12 ≈ Capitol City Online * KY/US * 502/875-8938 * cco.ath.cx